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I just set up Fedora Core 4 on an old computer, and found out that I may need an little more harddrive space. I was able to find a more ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User Tommaso's Avatar
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    Adding an additional Hard Drive


    I just set up Fedora Core 4 on an old computer, and found out that I may need an little more harddrive space. I was able to find a more recent hard drive that was used as the primary master on a system runing windows NT. So far, all i did was take the harddrive off of the comupter, and i was just wondering if there is any neccessity to clear that harddrive or do something, before i hook it up as a slave to my linux system. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Linux User nalg0rath's Avatar
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    The drive is probably jumpered as a Master, check out the instructions of how to jumper it (usually on the sticker on the HDD). You jumper the harddrive by moving the little clip on the pins on the "back" of the HDD (the pins are often located left of where you plug in the IDE/ATA -cable).
    You can erase the drive from the FC4 installation program.

  3. #3
    Linux User Tommaso's Avatar
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    I have already changed the jumper settings, but i don't know how to erase the drive with the fedora core 4 disk. Should i plug the harddrive in, and boot off the fedora install disk? Also what should i do once i the fedora install program launches?

  4. #4
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    You haven't made clear what it is you want to do. In your first post, you had FC on the first disk and you wanted to use the second for extra space. In your second post, it sounds like you want to re-install FC, using the second disk instead of the first.

    If you want to re-install, just connect your disks the way you want them and decide which will be the boot disk and set your BIOS for that. No other set-up should be required to install. During the partitioning part of the install, you will (as you know) need to work out what actual partitions you use for the Linux system and what additional partitions you want to mount. Installation will automatically re-format any Linux or non-Linux partitions, depending on what you input during the partitioning part of the install.

    If you just want to add a spare drive to your Linux system, you need to do the following:
    • 1. Physically install the drive
      2. Start Linux
      3. Partition the drive using 'fdisk', 'cfdisk' or 'QtParted'
      4. Format each new partition using 'mkfs'
      5. Create the mount point for each new partition using 'mkdir'
      6. Edit the file /etc/fstab to define how each new partition is to be mounted and where. The manual pages for the 'mount' command (do 'man mount') will tell you most of the specifics for what to put in the fstab file.
      7. Once the partition is included in fstab, use the mount command to mount the partition the first time, unless you reboot first.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  5. #5
    Linux User Tommaso's Avatar
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    Sorry about the misunderstanding, i am only trying to add a spare hardrive to my linux system. When i was talking about the install disks, i was only wondering if they could automatically partition and format my hardrive w/out installing Fedora. I am afraid that i dont understand your instructions through, cuz i'm a newbie and I dont know what fdisk, cfdisk, or QtParted are. Will Someone please enlighten me?

  6. #6
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    The installation disks for Fedora are pretty limited in what they can be used for: installation and rescue. Other distros have more utility, but it sounds like you have the tools you need for now. If your new Fedora installation works okay, you can do the commands I mentioned but they need to be run at a command line. The command line is really like the foundation of Linux, so it's fundamental to making Linux work for you. Remember that anything you do in Linux, you can do with a command line, one way or another.

    Anyways, get the drive in place, get into your Linux and then: find the icon that looks like a tiny TV screen, called "Terminal". I think you will find it if you click the red hat, then "System Tools", then "Terminal". When you do that and you see "Terminal", click on it and hold and drag that thing down (or up) to the "panel" where there are other icons at the edge of the screen. If you do that, next time you need a terminal ( or "terminal console"), you won't have to look for it. So first thing to do before using any unfamiliar command is to read the manual pages for it. So for 'fdisk', at the terminal, do this:
    Code:
    $ man fdisk
    Don't type the '$', that should be there already. After you've read until your head is swimming, press 'q' to quit from the manual page.

    To do dangerous stuff like partitioning, you need to "be root", so do
    Code:
    $ su -    <--that's "su"<space><dash>
    &#40;enter root password when asked&#41;
    #
    Notice the '$' changed to a '#': that means you are all-powerful root. And then you'll be able to do:
    Code:
    # fdisk -l     <--that's "fdisk"<space><dash><"EL", not one>
            &#40;here, you will see both of your hard drives&#58; the slave will be either /dev/hdb or /dev/hdd, maybe something like the following&#41;
    
    Disk /dev/hdb&#58; 18.2 GB, 18210037760 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 2213 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
     
       Device Boot    Start       End    Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/hdb1   *         1      2213  17775891   83  Linux
    Read the part where it says "Disk /dev/hdb:" or whatever it says and then you will know enough to do 'fdisk /dev/hdb'. Read all the instructions, and be brave: it's a new install so what have you got to lose?

    Cheers~
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  7. #7
    Linux User Tommaso's Avatar
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    Thanks for the instructions!
    I will read the long "fdisk manual", and start the process. I'll post again if i encounter any problems along the way.

  8. #8
    Linux User Tommaso's Avatar
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    Of course, as luck would have it, i have already encountered a problem.
    for some reason when i type fdisk -l or i also tried sfdisk -s /dev/hda the termianal says:
    bash: sfdisk: command not found
    or
    bash: fdisk: command not found
    I wouldn't be surprised if i am doing something completely wrong, cuz i've only use the terminal a few times.

  9. #9
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    It sounds like you didn't become the root user or the superuser. Using the command 'su -' as shown previously requests permission to access all files in the system and it also gives you the root users' environment paramters including root's path. The command 'fdisk' should be in the directory /sbin/, so you would have gotten a different result if you had done '/sbin/fdisk /dev/hdb' than if you had done 'fdisk /dev/hdb'.

    Maybe it's just as well that your command did not work. If your new drive is slave to your Linux drive master, you don't want to do <anything>/dev/hda because that is your Linux system. Further, you might not want to use 'sfdisk'. Very few Linux man pages say that a command is "very dangerous", but 'sfdisk' does. Many users prefer 'cfdisk', the rest of us stick with 'fdisk'.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  10. #10
    Linux User Tommaso's Avatar
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    More Problems

    Well, good thing that everything didn't go smoothly or it looks like i might have tried to repartition my master drive Goes to show how well i know linux. So Now i was able to get into fdisk, i hadn't put /sbin/fdisk previously, but i'm not sure which disklabel to use (I'm not quite sure what that is, but i found the different ones under "man fdisk"). fdisk lists BSD/SUN, IRIX/SGI, and a DOS type partition. Then I also dont understand what commands to use to start the partition. Sorry for all these questions but i really don't know what i am doing.

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