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Ok, so I finally got Linux installed (Suse 10.0) after talking about doing it for about a year, I like the general feel of it (and am sick of arguing ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User
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    Modems and installs and such things


    Ok, so I finally got Linux installed (Suse 10.0) after talking about doing it for about a year, I like the general feel of it (and am sick of arguing with MS BS) but am a complete newbee/idiot when it comes to doing anything.

    So getting to the point (at last!), I have a dial-up modem installed which has been recognised by the system, I have a driver for it on CD, and I have no idea what to do to get it all working.

    Essentially what I'd like to know is;
    1. How do I install the the driver to get the modem working?
    2. How do i then enter the necessary ISP info and dial up to the net?

    I know these are the most basic of questions, but I've only been running Linux for about 17hours and really am an absolute newbee at it all. So if anyone can help me out, or give a link to a good how to article it'd be most appreciated.

    Then once I have some idea what I'm doing I can get my printer working!

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    your mode, a dial-up analog modem (upto 56k speed)? Internal (ie. a PCI card) or external? If external, USB or serial connect?

    Right, that's enough questioning from me.

    If you need a driver, that probably means its internal. The driver you have (on the CDROM), is it a Linux or a Windows driver? They're drifferent. If it's a Linux driver, does it come as a package (such as a .rpm or .apt file)?

    Sorry, I lied about the questioning.

    As to setting up ISPs. If you use KDE, then use the kppp dialer. If you use Gnome, use the network connection wizard.

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie ryptyde's Avatar
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    I used KInternet in SUSE 10.0 as that was what was available during the "minimal install".I later installed more packages and KPPP was one of them.I use a US Robotics 5610B internal modem and it has worked with most Linux distros I've tried.

  4. #4
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    Sorry, should have given more details there, it's a 56k internal PCI software modem with Conexant chipset, the driver is a Linux driver(!) and is an .rpm file, so yes it's a package.

    I'm using KDE, so I'll see if I've got kppp (if it's not installed I think I just may have it on CD somewhere) otherwise Kinternet it is. Although when I looked at Kinternet it wouldn't even allow root to configure it (unless that's just because there's no driver for the modem installed?).

  5. #5
    Linux User oosterhouse's Avatar
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    Install the driver, try to dial up using one of the above mentioned dialers, and if it doesnt work, of course come back to the forums.

  6. #6
    Banned CodeRoot's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    You might also check into:

    [KDE Control Center] -> 'YaST2 Modules' -> 'Network Devices' -> 'Modem'

    This is correct for SuSE 9.1 -- I am guessing/assuming that it will be the same in SuSE10.0 (or something very similar).

    (will need root privilege/password)

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    even though I've got a copy of Suse10 on this box, I'm not very good at the whol;e YAST thing, so here is how to install the rpm file without YAST.

    1) Put the CDROM in and make sure that it is mounted (this should happen automagically, and a icon appear on the desktop). Open up the CDROM icon and have a look at the name of the folder that it has been mounted on (it will probably be soemthing like /media/cdrom or /mnt/cdrom or something along those lines). Make a note of it, you'll need it in a moment.
    2) Open up a text console (right click on the desktop and click on Konsole...).
    3) Make yourself superuser (aka root user, aka admin user). Enter su - followed, when prompted, with the superuser password (you set this up when you installed Linux). Note: the hypen after the su is meant to be there (su followed by a space followed by a hyphen).
    4) The command line will now end with a # rather than a $ . Change directory to the cdrom (that's why I asked you to note down where it was mounted), using the 'cd' command. So, if the CDROM is on the /media/cdrom directory (mount pint) then your command would be 'cd /media/cdrom' . Get the idea?
    5) Now find the rpm file (I suppose I ought to have asked you to find the complete path name to the rpm file, rather than just the mount point. Old habbits die hard). If necessary, do some 'ls' commands and further 'cd' commands.
    6) Now install the .rpm file by entering rpm -ihv filename.rpm , where filename.rpm is replaced by the filename of your driver.

    When the driver loads itself, it should tell you that it is creating a /dev/ something or other (such as /dev/ttyLT1) and, hopefully, it will also create a link between this new device (that represents the internal modem) and the /dev/modem device. It is either of these that you use in kppp as the modem device.

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

  8. #8
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    Thanks Nerderello, I printed your reply out and followed it, then configured all my ISP info through Yast and Kinternet (needed both before I could connect). So I'm now connected to the net on my Linux system!

  9. #9
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    good to see that it worked.

    If you need any more help just post your questions here.

    Also, see if the posts in the tutorial section help you.

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

  10. #10
    Linux Newbie
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    installing a external modem...

    im changing my internal modem.. with FREE driver from linuxant to an external one.. do i need to uninstall the free driver also? how can i configure my external modem?
    P4 1.8, 1G DDR ram, 64mb GF2 MX400, 80G WD and 40G Maxtor, ECS mobo. Playing XP,Slack 12.0 and Vector Linux 5.8 GOLD, STD 6.0 Zenwalk 4.6.1, OpenBSD 3.9

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