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Hi, i didn't know where to put this, thought this would be reasonable as it's to do with hard disks.... What is a suggested set of rules for mounting a ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    fstab problems


    Hi, i didn't know where to put this, thought this would be reasonable as it's to do with hard disks....

    What is a suggested set of rules for mounting a Windows FAT32 drive under Linux to auto mount at boot? Currently i have
    Code:
    noauto,user,sync    0 0
    now i know the noauto will cause it to not mount at boot... however, i haven't had a lot of experience in using the fstab file. I want to be able to write to a windows drive, and treat it as i would in windows. What's the best settings for the fstab/user settings?
    "I am not an alcoholic, alcoholics go to meetings"
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  2. #2
    Linux Engineer
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    mine all llook like
    Code:
    /dev/hda5 /mnt/win_c vfat umask=0 defaults 0 0

  3. #3
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    and i assume you can do everything on them? read/write/delete?
    "I am not an alcoholic, alcoholics go to meetings"
    Registered Linux user = #372327

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer
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    yep the umask=0 thing pretty much means anyone can read/write them, if u search i remeber this beign explained in details a few weeks ago

    and if for some reason u want user to be able to mount/umount the drive add ,user in there. bu this IMO should not be included since the drive will mount at boot

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie
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    If you are using WinXP with NTFS partioning notice this first:

    Kernel 2.6.x or higher has read/write support for NTFS,

    Lower then 2.6.x doesn't have write support
    Computers Are Like Air Conditioners... They\'re both useless with Windows open!

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer Giro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic_Slayer
    If you are using WinXP with NTFS partioning notice this first:

    Kernel 2.6.x or higher has read/write support for NTFS,

    Lower then 2.6.x doesn't have write support
    I would be carefull with that comment what i have found is that you cannot create new files/folders only modify them. Recheck your source and post back for us with details thanks.

  7. #7
    Linux Newbie robak's Avatar
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    the readme of 2.6 kernels says that you only can modify data on NTFS partitions, without changing their size. i also isn't possible to create or delete folders or files
    make install not love

    Registered Linux user number 369245

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