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Hi, I'm building a new computer and I decided to make my switch to Linux as well. I'm new to Linux and computer building as well, so I wanted to ...
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    Question Need Help deciding on a Graphics card


    Hi,
    I'm building a new computer and I decided to make my switch to Linux as well. I'm new to Linux and computer building as well, so I wanted to ask you a few questions about Hardware compatibility, specifically Graphics cards.
    I'm pretty sure I will use K/Ubuntu as the OS.

    Here are the (tentative) specs for the Comp:

    Processor: AMD Athlon 64 3200+ Orleans 2.0GHz Socket AM2

    Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-M55SLI-S4 Socket AM2 NVIDIA nForce4 SLI ATX AMD

    Memory: OCZ Gold 1GB (2 x 512MB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400)



    Right now, I'm looking for a model that I can use to play games, watch DVDs and movies and run that 3D desktop thing that I heard about.

    Here are some models I considered buying:

    BIOSTAR V7302EL16 GeForce 7300LE Supporting 256MB(128MB On board) GDDR2 PCI Express x16 Low Profile Video Card

    3D Fuzion 3DFR66256X GeForce 6600 256MB DDR PCI Express x16 Video Card i

    CHAINTECH SV62TC/64MB GeForce 6200TC 64MB On board(Supporting 256MB) DDR PCI Express x16 Low Profile Video Card

    I heard NIVIDA has better supported drivers. Is this true?

    Thank you for your help!

  2. #2
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    [QUOTE=The Iron Curtain
    I heard NIVIDA has better supported drivers. Is this true?

    Thank you for your help![/QUOTE]


    I prefer NVIDIA. Your MB is Nvidia based so def. go with NVIDIA.

    ATI's drivers are easier to install in my opinion. Get NVIDIA over 6600 and you should be set.

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    wait, just my opinion but why are you going AM2? Core 2 Duo is only a little more of an investment and it'll be a much better choice. Or if you dont have the cash for a E6300 or something, get a motherboard that supports Pentium D and save in getting an 805 or 820, that way you have the option of upgrading in the future to C2D

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    Quote Originally Posted by cfairchild
    wait, just my opinion but why are you going AM2? Core 2 Duo is only a little more of an investment and it'll be a much better choice. Or if you dont have the cash for a E6300 or something, get a motherboard that supports Pentium D and save in getting an 805 or 820, that way you have the option of upgrading in the future to C2D
    I just prefer AMD.


    Quote Originally Posted by armyguy5
    I prefer NVIDIA. Your MB is Nvidia based so def. go with NVIDIA.

    ATI's drivers are easier to install in my opinion. Get NVIDIA over 6600 and you should be set.
    I don't mind doing work as long as it works


    I'm new to video card stuff as well (mostly because I couldn't afford one for so long). What do I have to worry about in regards to DirectX and OpenGL?

    Also, what's the whole thing about hardware acceleration?

    Thank you very much for help so far!

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    well to answer your questions, Direct X is a runtime that handles multmedia stuff(gaming) used in Windows, the current version is 9.0c, but coming along with Vista will be DX10. to run the most current games you need the most current version of Direct X. Open GL, kinda in my own words is like a translator for actions, calculations graphics cards make. Graphic pipelines are also part of the equation as they send pixels to help render an image. The most current version is Open GL 2.0

    ps. Fanboyitis anyone??

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    Quote Originally Posted by cfairchild
    well to answer your questions, Direct X is a runtime that handles multmedia stuff(gaming) used in Windows, the current version is 9.0c, but coming along with Vista will be DX10. to run the most current games you need the most current version of Direct X. Open GL, kinda in my own words is like a translator for actions, calculations graphics cards make. Graphic pipelines are also part of the equation as they send pixels to help render an image. The most current version is Open GL 2.0

    ps. Fanboyitis anyone??
    However, if you're only going to be using this box for Linux, you don't have to worry about versions of DirectX at all. By the way, I also prefer Nvidia over ATI in Linux.
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    Thanks guys for all the help! I'm still looking at different video card models. Still not sure how much is TOO much in terms of Video RAM and GPUs, since I don't game that heavy. Any suggestions?

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Iron Curtain
    Thanks guys for all the help! I'm still looking at different video card models. Still not sure how much is TOO much in terms of Video RAM and GPUs, since I don't game that heavy. Any suggestions?
    Well, there's really no such thing as too much graphics power, in my opinion, but there is such a thing as "buying what you need". If you're not a gamer (or don't play things like Doom 3) a 6000 series Geforce card will probably do perfectly well and be much cheaper than a 7000 series card. I have a Geforce 6800 128MB and it performs like a champ. These are cheap now that the 7800 is out. If you're not a gamer, you don't want to spend more than about $150 on a decent card.

    Graphics card manufacturers vary in quality much like motherboard manufacturers. In fact, some of the same people make graphics boards. I've had good experiences with MSI and Gigabyte graphics cards as well as LeadTek (my 6800 was made by them). Go with a brand name you trust, and if possible buy the card at a brick-and-mortar store so you can take it back if something goes wrong.
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