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Hi all, after a year or so hiatus off from the last debacle of a Linux attempt, I have decided to give Linux another go. Old machine (P180/64MB RAM/2GB drive) ...
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  1. #1
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    ISA NIC's


    Hi all,

    after a year or so hiatus off from the last debacle of a Linux attempt, I have decided to give Linux another go.

    Old machine (P180/64MB RAM/2GB drive) that actually installed Debian smoothly this time. Got X running first try and everthing.

    I have three ISA NICS. An Intel FA82595, an SMC 83C690L and a NetgearEA201. None of these NIC's get recognized by the O/S and none will install. I actually found a driver for the Netgear card and got as far as extraction in DOS to the floppy. The readme then states-

    1. Login to the network as root. (On maintenance mode)

    2. Insert the driver diskette in Drive A and use the "doscp" command
    to copy the SCOUNIX Driver into the UNIX directory.
    For example:

    # cd /
    # doscp a:/scounix/setup setup
    (or # doscp b:/scounix/setup setup)
    # chmod +x /setup
    # ./setup a:/scounix
    (or # ./setup b:/scounix)

    Well doscp is not a valid command and i'll be darned if I can find any way to make it, or any of the others work. In fact I have scoured the WWW for two days on how to install a NIC driver under Linux and there simply is no 1-2-3 tutorial that I can find. Seems that if it is not recognized during the inital set-up you are SOL. Even going back to dpkg-reconfigure (insert package here, I have not found an applicable one yet) there is no way to tell it to look at the floppy. In fact isn't the filesystem completely different anyway? How could this ever work??

    Any ideas out there on how to do this? Please don't say go buy a PCI NIC.
    These things will all work all the way back to WIN 3.11 so Linux MUST be able to use them somehow.

    Jimi_l

  2. #2
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    If you have the ability to boot from CD, I would suggest getting a Gentoo LiveCD and booting it. Then you can check out what drivers it uses for the cards (if any). From here, you have a place to start.

    Boot back in to mandrake and install a new kernel source. Configure a new kernel to your liking. Make sure to include ISA support and check carefully to add the drivers for the NICs that you have in the Networking section.
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  3. #3
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    I dont have the ability to boot fromCD.

    I broke down and weasled a PCI NIC from an old machine and it works fine. I am on the machine now actually.

    How about a quickie OT question??

    Is there A command to remove all the temp files or any junk that has accumulated during the install?

    I thought I saw one somewhere but I can't find it again

    TIA,

    Jim

  4. #4
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    You can safely remove anything in /tmp that's not being used at the moment. Other than that, all that may have accumulated (that can be safely deleted) are package files (*.deb). I'm not sure where those are stored, but you can locate *.deb to find them.
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
    ~Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

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