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Originally Posted by tauro_kpo Is there a way to hack this??? :-S Only by compiling the source file of the driver on your box or by getting hold of a ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Newbie dilbert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    Is there a way to hack this??? :-S
    Only by compiling the source file of the driver on your box or by getting hold of a binary version that fits.

    Compiling isn't easy like simply writing "gcc joydev.c" as you need a few more system specific switches and locations of "include" directories.

    I always tried to copy some output of a general make file, otherwise I also gave up one time after an hour of unsuccessfully trying out switch and directory names.

    If you can find a Web page for that driver, maybe they offer there different versions of that driver. The question is where got knoppix their working driver from.
    Bus Error: Passengers dumped. Hech gap yo'q.

  2. #12
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    Only by compiling the source file of the driver on your box or by getting hold of a binary version that fits.
    Man I'm a newbie, please talk to me in english, or spanish but not that way.
    What do you mean by a binary version that fits? I have plenty joydev.ko in my computer, all from previous kernels, that kept themselves stored in the hard disk. I tried doing a insmod with any of them too, and I get the same I error I got when I tried to insmod the Knoppix joydev.ko.
    I think I specifically need a joydev.ko for my kernel version.
    And, how can I compile the source file of the driver?? Once I made a kernel, and I got as result a file called joydev.c. I tried doing gcc joydev.c, but it shows me lots of errors.
    Is this a way out? I mean, if I do it correctly, may I solve the problem?

    I tried looking for joydev.ko in Google, but nothing! I don't know much about linux, I'm not sure what a driver or a module it is in Linux.
    I load it as a module, but it is a driver because I use it for detecting my joysticks? Well, anyway, I seem to can't get anything good done.

    Please help!!!

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie dilbert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    Man I'm a newbie, please talk to me in english, or spanish but not that way.
    OK. Si tu lo dices ...

    Si, necesitas un fichero *.ko que no da errores con "insmod -f".

    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    I think I specifically need a joydev.ko for my kernel version.
    De esto te estaba hablando. El punto es como lograrlo.

    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    And, how can I compile the source file of the driver?? Once I made a kernel, and I got as result a file called joydev.c. I tried doing gcc joydev.c, but it shows me lots of errors.
    Is this a way out? I mean, if I do it correctly, may I solve the problem?
    Si tu lees bien el ultimo post, asi yo te dije que simplemente con "gcc joydev.ko" la cosa iba nunca a funcionar.

    Ok. The Spanish stuff was redundant eitherway.

    There are only those two ways:

    Getting a *.ko file (a binary file is a file that is not a text file) that doesn't produces errors but instead succeeds with "insmod"

    or

    Getting example output for all the switches, arguments or whatever you have to write on the command line when you lauch "gcc ...." to compile the driver from its source file. Normally, you apply about 10 compiler switches with "- something" and about 3 directories with the compiler switch "-I".

    If you got to that point, then barakalla, you're already like a professional.

    Generally, a driver is a program that the kernel uses to communicate with hardware.

    The driver is not a program that works for itself and standalone. You attach this piece od software called driver with the "insmod" command to the kernel.

    When the kernel wants to access particular hardware, it looks into its list of drivers and initialises or shuts down the hardware with functions from that driver. All other communication is also done with that driver.

    The selection of a driver is mainly done by kind of magic numbers. That is, the kernel reads company and product names, version or product numbers from the hardware and looks into its list to guess what driver to try with that hardware. If the initial trial works fine, the kernel uses this driver for further communication.

    In your case, both drivers do essentially the same job apart from that constant button press issue. That might be because of a software bug or the driver might not be entirely compatible with your hardware device version and the driver doesn't figure that out properly.

    Sometimes a driver is also called module. That is only to confuse the beginners.
    Bus Error: Passengers dumped. Hech gap yo'q.

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    Che, muy buen español

    now we have this two options, you say:

    get a compatible joydev.ko

    or

    compile my own joydev.ko from joydev.c

    I think option two it is completely unfeasible (for me) if someone can help here, would be great.

    And option number one, is probably the answer but, it's too freaking complicated :-S where will I get a compatible joydev.ko?

    Since Knoppix is based on debian, I'm thinking on installing debian on a virtual machine, updating it's kernel version to a kernel version equal to mine, and then try starting the module joydev.ko from this kernel on mine.
    Are there possibilities that this will work?

    Any other better idea?


    Thank you!

  5. #15
    Linux Newbie dilbert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    Che, muy buen espaņol
    "ņ"

    You got already the right keyboard.


    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    Since Knoppix is based on debian, I'm thinking on installing debian on a virtual machine, updating it's kernel version to a kernel version equal to mine, and then try starting the module joydev.ko from this kernel on mine.
    Are there possibilities that this will work?
    All depends on the asumption that debian will use the same driver as knoppix.

    At least, it looks more promising than the other options.

    (Vamos a ver, dijo el ciego ... )


    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    Any other better idea?
    Hmm, no.

    Suerte.
    Bus Error: Passengers dumped. Hech gap yo'q.

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    Me parece que el ciego no va a ver nada!

    I installed Ubuntu, that is based on Debian in a Virtual Machine with VMware.

    I compiled a kernel version similar to mine (mine is 2.6.20-1.2933.fc6 and the one I did in my Ubuntu was 2.6.20)
    But no! it's like I was trying to install the module from the Knoppix, I get the same error.

    Please! I don't know what to do now.

    I think the problem should be in other place. Since the joystick driver isn't it. What's greater than the joystick driver? I don't know, you are the gurus.
    Maybe the usb driver or something?

    Please, somebody!

    Thank you!

  7. #17
    Linux Newbie dilbert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    Me parece que el ciego no va a ver nada!
    Con mucha fe tambien el ciego puede ver un dia!


    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo
    Since the joystick driver isn't it.
    Are you sure? Did you make the same comparisons with "diff -su ..." and the like as before?

    But anyway this would tell you only what's up but not cure the problem.

    The exact problem is that the driver works with that joystick, only the joystick behaves as the buttins would be pressed continuously. Is that correct?

    The underlying USB stack only inserts the driver and handles the USB trafiic. The culprit can be only the driver. This piece of software handles the data that come from your joystick and sends data to it. The USB packets are only a standardised transport medium. They could also have used simple wires that go to a joystick connector on a board in a free slot of your PC as in the past.

    Why should the USB stack mess up your data only with that joystick? I presume a memory stick would work properly with that USB port.

    As your joystick works with the knoppix driver we can exclude a hardware problem with the buttons.

    Isn't there any possibility to get in contact with other people that use your joystick on a Linux distro other than knoppix?

    Often people don't report errors but rather avoid the problem. So, if there are really few people using Linux AND your joystick, some might simply use knoppix when they want to play, others might buy another joystick, but no one reports the error or is complaining.

    So maybe you can contact some people using your joystick or maybe the author or maintainer of the driver himself.

    From a basic view your driver is working because you can use this test program.

    Another thing I can only imagine is that there is something else to setup in XFree86conf or xorg.conf or what it is called. Do your manual or README file or the like also mention Linux or Unix in general?

    If you got a mouse for example, it also doesn't work properly if you don't enable the right things in those GUI config files. For example the buttons might work but the scroll wheel not.

    In "/etc/X11/xorg.conf" are at least "Input Devices". But I haven't much a clue as I configured only once a mouse in XFree86.conf.

    Maybe you spot a difference in this xorg.conf file on knoppix and on Ubuntu or you ask the question again in a section that deals more with this xorg GUI stuff.

    There is a possibility that the file size difference in the driver binaries comes only from having the same source files compiled on different distros and that the different behaviour comes only from a different xorg setup.
    Bus Error: Passengers dumped. Hech gap yo'q.

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