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Complete Linux newbie here, so bear with me. I decided that it might be worth my time installing Ubuntu on my laptop, even just for playing around with. At the ...
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  1. #1
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    Dualbooting Ubuntu with Vista - Vista partition not recognised


    Complete Linux newbie here, so bear with me. I decided that it might be worth my time installing Ubuntu on my laptop, even just for playing around with. At the time, I was dualbooting XP and Vista, but since my XP partition had gone to the dogs I decided to install it in there.

    So, now Ubuntu seems to be working fine and it's enjoyable - however, there are certainly things that I really need to get into Vista for. It seems that while installing itself, Ubuntu came across my Vista partition and added an entry for it in the GRUB config file. However, trying to use it from the boot menu just gives a cryptic "Error 12 : Invalid Device Requested".

    Here's how my partitions are set up, according to sudo fdisk -l :
    Code:
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1          11       88326   de  Dell Utility
    /dev/sda3              12       14201   113981175    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda4           14202       14593     3148740   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda5            4346       13940    77071806    7  HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda6           13941       14201     2096451   dd  Unknown
    /dev/sda7              12        4345    34812792   83  Linux
    
    Partition table entries are not in disk order
    
    Disk /dev/mmcblk0: 2059 MB, 2059403264 bytes
    38 heads, 37 sectors/track, 2860 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 1406 * 512 = 719872 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000
    sda5 is my Vista partition - it even appears on my Ubuntu desktop as a mounted volume and I can get in any files in there that way. Here's the contents of my /boot/grub/menu.lst :

    Code:
    # menu.lst - See: grub(8), info grub, update-grub(8)
    #            grub-install(8), grub-floppy(8),
    #            grub-md5-crypt, /usr/share/doc/grub
    #            and /usr/share/doc/grub-doc/.
    
    ## default num
    # Set the default entry to the entry number NUM. Numbering starts from 0, and
    # the entry number 0 is the default if the command is not used.
    #
    # You can specify 'saved' instead of a number. In this case, the default entry
    # is the entry saved with the command 'savedefault'.
    # WARNING: If you are using dmraid do not use 'savedefault' or your
    # array will desync and will not let you boot your system.
    default		0
    
    ## timeout sec
    # Set a timeout, in SEC seconds, before automatically booting the default entry
    # (normally the first entry defined).
    timeout		10
    
    ## hiddenmenu
    # Hides the menu by default (press ESC to see the menu)
    #hiddenmenu
    
    # Pretty colours
    #color cyan/blue white/blue
    
    ## password ['--md5'] passwd
    # If used in the first section of a menu file, disable all interactive editing
    # control (menu entry editor and command-line)  and entries protected by the
    # command 'lock'
    # e.g. password topsecret
    #      password --md5 $1$gLhU0/$aW78kHK1QfV3P2b2znUoe/
    # password topsecret
    
    #
    # examples
    #
    # title		Windows 95/98/NT/2000
    # root		(hd0,0)
    # makeactive
    # chainloader	+1
    #
    # title		Linux
    # root		(hd0,1)
    # kernel	/vmlinuz root=/dev/hda2 ro
    #
    
    #
    # Put static boot stanzas before and/or after AUTOMAGIC KERNEL LIST
    
    ### BEGIN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST
    ## lines between the AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST markers will be modified
    ## by the debian update-grub script except for the default options below
    
    ## DO NOT UNCOMMENT THEM, Just edit them to your needs
    
    ## ## Start Default Options ##
    ## default kernel options
    ## default kernel options for automagic boot options
    ## If you want special options for specific kernels use kopt_x_y_z
    ## where x.y.z is kernel version. Minor versions can be omitted.
    ## e.g. kopt=root=/dev/hda1 ro
    ##      kopt_2_6_8=root=/dev/hdc1 ro
    ##      kopt_2_6_8_2_686=root=/dev/hdc2 ro
    # kopt=root=UUID=f17bfcc4-a053-4b20-9ba2-070d24f102b4 ro
    
    ## Setup crashdump menu entries
    ## e.g. crashdump=1
    # crashdump=0
    
    ## default grub root device
    ## e.g. groot=(hd0,0)
    # groot=(hd0,6)
    
    ## should update-grub create alternative automagic boot options
    ## e.g. alternative=true
    ##      alternative=false
    # alternative=true
    
    ## should update-grub lock alternative automagic boot options
    ## e.g. lockalternative=true
    ##      lockalternative=false
    # lockalternative=false
    
    ## additional options to use with the default boot option, but not with the
    ## alternatives
    ## e.g. defoptions=vga=791 resume=/dev/hda5
    # defoptions=quiet splash
    
    ## should update-grub lock old automagic boot options
    ## e.g. lockold=false
    ##      lockold=true
    # lockold=false
    
    ## Xen hypervisor options to use with the default Xen boot option
    # xenhopt=
    
    ## Xen Linux kernel options to use with the default Xen boot option
    # xenkopt=console=tty0
    
    ## altoption boot targets option
    ## multiple altoptions lines are allowed
    ## e.g. altoptions=(extra menu suffix) extra boot options
    ##      altoptions=(recovery) single
    # altoptions=(recovery mode) single
    
    ## controls how many kernels should be put into the menu.lst
    ## only counts the first occurence of a kernel, not the
    ## alternative kernel options
    ## e.g. howmany=all
    ##      howmany=7
    # howmany=all
    
    ## should update-grub create memtest86 boot option
    ## e.g. memtest86=true
    ##      memtest86=false
    # memtest86=true
    
    ## should update-grub adjust the value of the default booted system
    ## can be true or false
    # updatedefaultentry=false
    
    ## should update-grub add savedefault to the default options
    ## can be true or false
    # savedefault=false
    
    ## ## End Default Options ##
    
    title		Ubuntu 7.10, kernel 2.6.22-14-generic
    root		(hd0,6)
    kernel		/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.22-14-generic root=UUID=f17bfcc4-a053-4b20-9ba2-070d24f102b4 ro quiet splash
    initrd		/boot/initrd.img-2.6.22-14-generic
    quiet
    
    title		Ubuntu 7.10, kernel 2.6.22-14-generic (recovery mode)
    root		(hd0,6)
    kernel		/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.22-14-generic root=UUID=f17bfcc4-a053-4b20-9ba2-070d24f102b4 ro single
    initrd		/boot/initrd.img-2.6.22-14-generic
    
    title		Ubuntu 7.10, memtest86+
    root		(hd0,6)
    kernel		/boot/memtest86+.bin
    quiet
    
    ### END DEBIAN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST
    
    # This is a divider, added to separate the menu items below from the Debian
    # ones.
    title		Other operating systems:
    root
    
    
    # This entry automatically added by the Debian installer for a non-linux OS
    # on /dev/sda1
    title		Dell Utility Partition
    root		(hd0,0)
    savedefault
    makeactive
    chainloader	+1
    
    
    # This entry automatically added by the Debian installer for a non-linux OS
    # on /dev/sda6
    title		Microsoft Windows XP Embedded
    root		(hd0,5)
    savedefault
    makeactive
    chainloader	+1
    
    title		Windows Vista
    rootnoverify	(hd0,4)
    makeactive
    chainloader	+1
    I noticed that the Ubuntu installer made an entry for sda6 (that's (hd0,5) right?), whereas sda5 should correspond to (hd0,4). I made a new entry for that and tried that, but the same Error 12. I changed root to rootnoverify, reading somewhere that might help, but no joy there either.

    Ubuntu works fine, but there are some programs that I can't use in Ubuntu that I really need to use for work (and play). I've probably screwed up something really obvious, but I really need to know if there's a solution to this problem (excluding repartitioning the whole drive and starting afresh?) I also apologise if I've missed out any important information, go easy on me.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Try to remove GRUB and re-install Vista Boot Loader. Check if Vista boots up by default. In case, it doesn't boot up, fix using repair option. Once vista starts booting up properly, you can re-install GRUB for dual booting. Follow instruction form here or here to re-install Vista Boot Loader.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils_casper View Post
    Try to remove GRUB and re-install Vista Boot Loader. Check if Vista boots up by default. In case, it doesn't boot up, fix using repair option. Once vista starts booting up properly, you can re-install GRUB for dual booting. Follow instruction form here or here to re-install Vista Boot Loader.
    I tried the first method, since I need to be in Vista to do the second...

    bootrec.exe /fixmbr works fine (and screwed up GRUB somehow, meaning I had to reinstall ubuntu), but when I try to run /fixboot it says "The volume does not contain a recognised file system. Please make sure that all required file system drivers are loaded and that the volume is not corrupt.".

    I don't know how to check if file system drivers are loaded, and I'm quite sure the volume isn't corrupt.

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  5. #4
    Just Joined! AceP45's Avatar
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    wtf r u using vista for???

    ok well mayb u shud wipe vista and just run fedora

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    Quote Originally Posted by AceP45 View Post
    wtf r u using vista for???

    ok well mayb u shud wipe vista and just run fedora
    I already said I need to use Vista for a bunch of programs that I need for work. Flash CS3 being one of the more prominent ones, and I don't particularly fancy bollocksing about with WINE to get that working if I can just have Vista available in a dualboot setup.

    Also, I'm a hobbyist programmer, so it would be nice to be able to release and test programs for both Linux and Vista. A whole bunch of reasons - I'm not looking for a way around using Vista here, I specifically want a dual-boot configuration.

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    I'd try SuperGrub CD.

  8. #7
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danbo Daxter
    bootrec.exe /fixmbr works fine (and screwed up GRUB somehow, meaning I had to reinstall ubuntu), but when I try to run /fixboot it says "The volume does not contain a recognised file system. Please make sure that all required file system drivers are loaded and that the volume is not corrupt.".
    Why did you re-install Ubuntu? Have you fixed Vista problem? I mentioned earlier that first solution will remove GRUB only and its very easy to re-install GRUB. There was no need to re-install whole Ubuntu OS.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

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    Quote Originally Posted by devils_casper View Post
    Why did you re-install Ubuntu? Have you fixed Vista problem? I mentioned earlier that first solution will remove GRUB only and its very easy to re-install GRUB. There was no need to re-install whole Ubuntu OS.
    I don't think reinstalling Ubuntu has really done much apart from create a minor inconvenience (didn't have very many important files on that partition anyway). I still can't get into Vista, but I've evacuated my important files from my Vista partition and I'm going to try to reinstall Vista there and hope that the bootloader repairs itself. From there, hopefully I can re-install GRUB to hopefully finally get the dual-boot set up how I want it

  10. #9
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    If you are planing to re-install, install Vista first. Create two partitions for Ubuntu 's root and swap using Vista Partitioning Tool only. Start Ubuntu installation and assign / and swap mount points to new partitions in Partitioning Section. Installer will format partitions and set dual boot itself.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils_casper View Post
    If you are planing to re-install, install Vista first. Create two partitions for Ubuntu 's root and swap using Vista Partitioning Tool only. Start Ubuntu installation and assign / and swap mount points to new partitions in Partitioning Section. Installer will format partitions and set dual boot itself.
    Did this word for word and now both Ubuntu and Vista work perfectly. Thanks!

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