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I am starting a new thread to document my installation of Ubuntu. Since my plan is to erase the drive on this laptop and start over, I want to keep ...
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  1. #1
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    Fresh Kubuntu install


    I am starting a new thread to document my installation of Ubuntu. Since my plan is to erase the drive on this laptop and start over, I want to keep a journal online where it won't disappear.

    My first goal is to get obtain a distro that I know works, and then test it on other computers in the school computer lab. As a secondary goal, I'd like to see if Kubuntu runs better on my personal laptop.

    I'm running Ubuntu 7.1 now, but the 802.3 NIC doesn't work, the SD card reader doesn't work, and the special keys like brightness don't work. (The 802.11 NIC and USB do work. The GUI also functions, although the specific graphics chipset isn't recognized.)

    I went to http://releases.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/7.10/ and am downloading the PC (Intel x86) desktop ISO. The download is running at a snail's pace (5kb/sec). I want to DL from the official source so that no one can blame the source if it fails.

    I will be installing it on a new Toshiba Satellite L355-S7812. I has a Core2Duo processor, but I don't know which one. I will have to dig up which chipset it used for video and so forth.

    Regarding the previous discussion on why Linux could not be installed on a roomful of computers: I already have Ubuntu 7.1 running on this machine, so it I think I am giving Linux a fair chance. If it doesn't work, fine. But if this does work, then I will take the same disk to the computer lab and try it on other computers.

    Following the suggestion of Dapper Dan, my plan is to DL the ISO, check to be sure the file downloaded error free, burn it to a disk with verify turned on, and pop the disk in the drive.

  2. #2
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    Hello and welcome,

    Quote Originally Posted by Jo Ann Yamamoto View Post
    I'm running Ubuntu 7.1 now, but the 802.3 NIC doesn't work, the SD card reader doesn't work, and the special keys like brightness don't work. (The 802.11 NIC and USB do work. The GUI also functions, although the specific graphics chipset isn't recognized.)
    The sd card reader should work as long as it's an usb device. From hard disks, to cameras and sd readers, they all should work with the usb-storage device driver. I am not familiar with ubuntu, but that driver should be included by default on most distros, and I think that ubuntu, a distro which is said to be simple to manage, should mount them automatically (though, as said, I have no experience with ubuntu at all).

    If your sd reader attached to an usb port (either internally or externally? or is it attached in any other way?

    I went to Kubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) and am downloading the PC (Intel x86) desktop ISO. The download is running at a snail's pace (5kb/sec). I want to DL from the official source so that no one can blame the source if it fails.
    Remember, it's not just the "from where". It can be corrupt, it doesn't matter where did you download from. Usually, there are md5 sums available in the same page that you use to download the isos. After the iso is downloaded, you MUST use md5sum to check that the md5 sums for the isos are correct.

    Corruption can always happen, even if the source is reliable. So, before burning a disk, it's always imperative to check that it's correct. That's why the md5sums are there.

    For example, if you download from here:

    Your Download will Start Shortly | Ubuntu

    Below the download links, you'll see this:

    Learn how to verify that your CD download ok: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowToMD5SUM
    There you will find the md5sums, and the how-to-do-it.


    I will be installing it on a new Toshiba Satellite L355-S7812. I has a Core2Duo processor
    The processor is only relevant to decide with kind of installation you will be doing (32 vs. 64 bits). Core2 supports both, so, you can choose whatever fits you. If you download the 32 bits (x86) cd, you can then reuse it later on lower machines. If you use the 64 bits one, you will only be able to use it on cpu's which can handle 64 bits extensions.

    I will have to dig up which chipset it used for video and so forth.
    Use any livecd (or use ubuntu if you already have it installed, it's the same). Just login into your console, or open a terminal windows if you are into XWindow. There, you must type this:

    sudo lspci
    Or just lspci if you logged in as the root user (ubuntu doesn't allow that, methinks).

    Then, post the output here. That will tell us everything that's attached to your pci bus, including your chipset, your video card and your sound and net controller chips. Most of this should work out of the box on modern distros, but it's not always the case.

    Regarding the previous discussion on why Linux could not be installed on a roomful of computers: I already have Ubuntu 7.1 running on this machine, so it I think I am giving Linux a fair chance. If it doesn't work, fine. But if this does work, then I will take the same disk to the computer lab and try it on other computers.
    Fair enough. Everyone has the right and chance to test everything, and decide what suits him or her better. That's the whole concept of the free software. You decide. If you like it, then you will stay.

    If not, well... Not everything suits everyone, and that's right.

    If you are of the kind that can read manuals yourself, you should find this useful as well:

    https://help.ubuntu.com/

    Again, welcome and luck on your quest.

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    status: downloading and Md5sum

    My continuing story: I downloaded "kubuntu-7.10-desktop-i386.is". (Incidentally, I went online and bought a real Kubuntu install disk, just in case, together with the official manual. Total with shipping was about ten bucks. Pretty reasonable.)

    I just checked the MD5sum. To do that, I went to the terminal, switched to the desktop directory, and typed " md5sum kubuntu-7.10-desktop-i386.iso".

    It responded "ae9b209fe4b9caf545fa2011631de797 kubuntu-7.10-desktop-i386.iso", which exactly matches the ae9b209fe4b9caf545fa2011631de797 checksum found on https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuHashes

    Next I right clicked on the ISO, and chose "burn to CD". No problems, but I do wish the CD burner software had a "verify" option to compare the burned CD with the ISO. I'm not usually so touchy, but I'm on a scientific mission.

    Next I am going to boot from the CD and chose "Check CD for defects".

    Wish me luck. If the CD is okay, I am going to wipe the laptop I am using now and reinstall. If it dies, I will be logging in here from another computer screaming "help."

    [As I said in my first message, this is a journal of what I'm doing to install Kubuntu on my personal laptop. My computer class experienced problems of all sorts a few weeks ago, and I'm trying to figure out why. The classroom thing went by quickly, so I want to go back over everything step by step, and since I will eventually wipe my laptop, I'm writing everything here. Posting it publicly also means that someone will probably point out a mistake if I make one. ]

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    Quote Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post
    Hello and welcome,
    Thanks very much.

    Quote Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post
    The sd card reader should work as long as it's an usb device.
    I was thinking the same thing. So I just checked it again, and it does work fine. It was the memory card that was a dud. Just my luck, I guess.

    As for your suggestion to check the md5sum, that's just what I did, thanks. I'm about to boot the CD to check its integrity.

    You also suggested I type "sudo lspci" at the console. I'll do that next, but I will start another thread in the appropriate forum to try to figure out the 802.3 NIC, video and keyboard.

    Thanks for our help, i92guboj.

    Jo Ann

  6. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Manchunian's Avatar
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    Hello Jo Ann,

    It's nice to see that you are persisting with this. Well done - and welcome to the Linux community. It's been a bit of a bumpy start - but hopefully you'll enjoy using this OS once you've got it going.
    I just wanted to add, and maybe it's too late now, that you'd best stick with the 32 bit version of (K)Ubuntu - even if you have a 64 bit machine. For the moment, the 64 bit version can be a little touch and go, whereas the 32 bit version runs very well.

    Good luck!
    Distribution: Archlinux
    Processor: 3 x Amd 64 bit
    Ram: 4 GB
    Graphics card: Nvidia GeForce 9800 GT

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manchunian
    I just wanted to add, and maybe it's too late now, that you'd best stick with the 32 bit version of (K)Ubuntu - even if you have a 64 bit machine. For the moment, the 64 bit version can be a little touch and go, whereas the 32 bit version runs very well.
    Jo Ann Yamamoto has downloaded 32 bit version only.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jo Ann Yamamoto
    My continuing story: I downloaded "kubuntu-7.10-desktop-i386.is
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  8. #7
    Linux Enthusiast Manchunian's Avatar
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    So she has! Hopefully it's all working properly?
    Distribution: Archlinux
    Processor: 3 x Amd 64 bit
    Ram: 4 GB
    Graphics card: Nvidia GeForce 9800 GT

  9. #8
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    According to this specifications page from Toshiba, that laptop shouldn't have any serious issues. Intel Wireless 3945 usually works out of the box for me (my laptop has it as well) and the onboard Intel graphics should also work. If not, there is a package that can help called 915resolution. If your wireless doesn't automatically work, find a net-connected computer and get the official Intel Linux wireless drivers here:

    Intel® Wireless WiFi Link drivers for Linux*

    Hope everything works out for you! Looking at your other thread, we may sound like we're arguing with you but I think we're all just quite shocked that you've had so much trouble. With some luck perhaps we'll figure out why.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  10. #9
    Linux Enthusiast Manchunian's Avatar
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    I think we're all just quite shocked that you've had so much trouble.
    Absolutely. Shock is the word.
    Distribution: Archlinux
    Processor: 3 x Amd 64 bit
    Ram: 4 GB
    Graphics card: Nvidia GeForce 9800 GT

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    Thumbs up Installation issue resolution

    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe View Post
    Intel Wireless 3945 usually works out of the box
    Yes, it works fine. It's the wired NIC that doesn't work.

    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe View Post
    we may sound like we're arguing with you but I think we're all just quite shocked that you've had so much trouble.
    It does seem like some folks are arguing. Like, when I say that my classmates all had trouble, and someone responds that Linux runs for millions of others. That makes me sound like a liar or a fool. All I can do is report what I have seen.

    I think I have figured out the answer. We just have a different definition of "installs with no problem."

    It's like when my brother says it won't be any problem to install a gas dryer. To him, "no problem" means "extend the gas line, buy an adapter, borrow a special tool, install a new 20amp branch circuit, install a vent, check the gas pressure, shim the base, repair the drywall, plug it in and you're done." For him, that's no problem. But for your average person, it's a problem.

    I mean "no problem" like installing a microwave: "plug it in, you're done."

    If anything comes from this discussion, I would hope that somebody looks at the installation process from the non-geek standpoint. It could only help Linux spread.

    Here's an example. As I said, Linux installation died on me multiple times, with no way for me to fix it except try another distro or machine. But on one occasion, it did a marvelous thing. It started, but in a text-mode way. It let me pick a new video driver from a list, and presto, I was running. If installation always worked that way, my whole class would be Linux cheerleaders now.

    Anyway, I am grateful for the help, though. Thanks for responding, Moe.

    Jo Ann

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