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Thanks for your repaly the distribution is which format(.zip, .bin).. and Is application(fire fox, java, oracle) is related to the distribution? I am little bit confuse about these distributions and ...
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  1. #11
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    Thanks for your repaly
    the distribution is which format(.zip, .bin)..
    and Is application(fire fox, java, oracle) is related to the distribution?
    I am little bit confuse about these distributions and application..
    Can you please explan in details (possible with examples)..

    Thanks in advance..


    Thanks
    Sateesh

  2. #12
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    Hi,

    If you want to compare Linux Distributions and Windows, we can imagine, Windows 2003 is a Distribution, like Windows Xp of Microsoft NT kernel.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamsateesh View Post
    Thanks for your repaly
    the distribution is which format(.zip, .bin)..
    and Is application(fire fox, java, oracle) is related to the distribution?
    I am little bit confuse about these distributions and application..
    Can you please explan in details (possible with examples)..

    Thanks in advance..


    Thanks
    Sateesh
    You are really disoriented.

    Linux is *just* a kernel. The kernel is the system core, which would be of no use at all without any tools around. It's just a core and a collection of drivers (nothing simple at all, but I highly doubt you care about deeper complexities at this point).

    A "distro", "distribution" or "linux flavor" is *something* composed by a kernel plus a lot of user tools. Each distro comes with a predefined set of software, different programs and (maybe) graphics user interfaces. Example of distributions are SuSE, Fedora, Mandriva, Gentoo, Ubuntu, Slackware, etc. They all share the same kernel (a.k.a. system core), but the user tools they install by default might be different or might come configured in different ways.

    Linux distributions comes with a "package manager", and *each* distro has a different package manager, so, the package manager for SuSE is not the same than you'd get on Gentoo, and those two are way too different to the one you'd get on Ubuntu. This package manager is used to install all the software in your system, and as long as possible, you should ALWAYS use it to install software in your system, because:

    1. it's just easier
    2. you don't have to search for downloads yourself
    3. you don't have to install anything manually
    4. it's supported by your distro, so asking for help in the forums for your distro will be much easier (and most distros will offer you exactly zero support if you insist on installing software manually on your own)
    5. you make sure your packages are compatible at both, binary and configuration level
    6. your package manager configures everything for you most times
    7. it's fast
    8. if you insist on installing manually, you can (and at some point you will) break your installation, eventually rendering it useless


    These is just a quick list that came to my mind.

    There are a few exceptions when installing something manually can be justified, but then you are the one that will have to maintain that, since your distribution will not be aware of that software.

    Being that said, the whole linux concept is founded over the assumption that you are going to take some effort, and read the manuals. If you don't know how to install packages in your distribution you obviously did not do that. The package manager is the core of any distro and it's distinctive piece. So, you should really learn how to use it to install software and maintain your distribution. Don't hesitate to ask for additional help here if you need it, but you need to take the manuals yourself and read a bit first.

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