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Right now I have 10gb partition on my 500gb external running Ubuntu. I have always had problems running Ubuntu on my external. It only seems to be able to mount ...
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  1. #1
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    Which Linux?


    Right now I have 10gb partition on my 500gb external running Ubuntu. I have always had problems running Ubuntu on my external. It only seems to be able to mount my Laptop's internal HD and the NTFS storage partition on my external a quater of the time. Now that my internal HD somehow got a virus I want to use Ubuntu to back up my files I can't! What linux distro do you think i should replace ubuntu with? I don't need anything big, puppy linux does everything i need, but i want to have something installed to be able to rely on that will not give me issues with NTFS drives.
    Any Ideas?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    ntfs-3g driver for read/write of ntfs partitions and mount drives using uuid should make any distro including Ubuntu reliable for mounting ntfs partitions.
    Have you tried to manually mount the partition? does it throw any errors?
    Can you post the output of
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    ls /dev/disk/by-uuid -l
    the -l in both cases is a small L not a one.
    Output of
    Code:
    cat /etc/fstab
    would also be useful.

  3. #3
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    I have tried and was able to read it sometimes but i haven't used it in months so now i have no idea.

    nicholas@nicholas-laptop:~$ sudo fdisk -l

    Disk /dev/sda: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
    240 heads, 63 sectors/track, 20673 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 15120 * 512 = 7741440 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xed1f86f7

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 20673 156287848+ 7 HPFS/NTFS

    Disk /dev/sdb: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x44fdfe06

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 * 1 1338 10747453+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sdb2 1339 60801 477636547+ 7 HPFS/NTFS


    nicholas@nicholas-laptop:~$ ls /dev/disk/by-uuid -l
    total 0
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 2009-03-08 18:45 0DA31CB82112C1CB -> ../../sdb2
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 2009-03-08 18:45 6a01f269-0d0c-4124-bd58-d54669943f7b -> ../../sdb1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 2009-03-08 18:44 D8042237042218D0 -> ../../sda1


    nicholas@nicholas-laptop:~$ cat /etc/fstab
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # -- This file has been automaticly generated by ntfs-config --
    #
    # <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>

    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    # Entry for /dev/sdb1 :
    UUID=6a01f269-0d0c-4124-bd58-d54669943f7b / ext3 relatime,errors=remount-ro 0 1
    /dev/scd0 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0 0
    /dev/sda1 /media/windows ntfs-3g defaults,locale=en_US.UTF-8 0 0

    I have the NTFS configuration tool under system tools and Ubuntu Tweak

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas482109 View Post
    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 20673 156287848+ 7 HPFS/NTFS

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 * 1 1338 10747453+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sdb2 1339 60801 477636547+ 7 HPFS/NTFS


    nicholas@nicholas-laptop:~$ ls /dev/disk/by-uuid -l
    total 0
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 2009-03-08 18:45 0DA31CB82112C1CB -> ../../sdb2
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 2009-03-08 18:45 6a01f269-0d0c-4124-bd58-d54669943f7b -> ../../sdb1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 2009-03-08 18:44 D8042237042218D0 -> ../../sda1
    In /etc/fstab uuid information is used for root mount but not for /dev/sda1 which is mounted to /media/windows
    For the purposes of doing the data recovery I suggest you unmount the /dev/sda1 partition using
    Code:
    sudo umount /dev/sda1
    then create folders to mount your ntfs partitions to in /media using
    Code:
    sudo mkdir /media/internal-ntfs
    sudo mkdir /media/external-ntfs
    then mount them using
    Code:
    sudo ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /media/internal-ntfs
    sudo ntfs-3g /dev/sdb2 /media/external-ntfs
    You can confirm correct mounting by typing
    Code:
    mount
    you should be able to replace the /dev/sda1 or a /dev/sdb2 in /etc/fstab with
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/D8042237042218D0 for /dev/sda1
    and
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/0DA31CB82112C1CB for /dev/sdb2

    You should also be able to replace /dev/sd... with /dev/disk/by-uuid/... in the ntfs-3g command.

    After you reformat/resize partitions you may find uuid values change and you will need to update them.

    The /dev/sda and /dev/sdb designations can change depending on BIOS settings, which is one reason for using uuid information to identify the correct partition instead.

  5. #5
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    OK, so after i mount, create directories, then mount I need to edit the fstab file? will this make it so when i book up in ubuntu the drives will automaticly be mounted?

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Adding entries to /etc/fstab will mean partitions are automatically mounted at boot, but since you have an infected Windows partitions you are likely to format and re-install Windows? so uuid will change.

    Actual entries you may want in /etc/fstab for partitions may need to be altered for example I have
    Code:
    /dev/sdb1 /media/sdb1 ntfs-3g ro,allow_other 0 0
    /dev/sdb2 /media/sdb2 ntfs-3g rw,allow_other 0 0
    because I wanted all user to have read only access to sdb1 but need to be able to write to /dev/sdb2.
    You will find useful info in man pages for ntfs-3g and mount to help pick the correct options for what you want.

  7. #7
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    OK, here's what's going on now

    It worked fine, i had my internal mounted to /meda/windows and my internal mounted to /media/external. The icons worked in the Computer window. I restarted and it was fine. I didn't do anything with the fstab file because i wasn't sure what to do. I booted windows and rebooted into ubuntu. Now the icons in computer don't work and the /media/windows folder is empty and the /media/external folder is gone! When i try to mount it says that they are in use. Whats the deal with this? should i just force it to mount like it tells me to in the terminal?

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Run mount on its own to see what you have mounted and to which folders.

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