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Say you've reached your max of 4 primary partitions - you've got one for windows, one for swap, one for Linux, and one massive one for data. However, say you've ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie Themer's Avatar
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    Logical/Extended partition vs. Primary; performance differences?


    Say you've reached your max of 4 primary partitions - you've got one for windows, one for swap, one for Linux, and one massive one for data. However, say you've still got lots of space left, and you want a secondary Linux system, say a 32 bit version of what you already have for testing things that for some reason aren't available for 64 bit no matter what you do or read. You're thinking about shrinking your data partition maybe a few gigabytes to make room for one more, when a thought crosses your mind - if you can have only 4 primary partitions, but any (reasonable) number of logical/extended partitions (I don't remember which is the container and which is the actual partition), is there perhaps an underlying reason for this? Do, just maybe, primary partitions have some advantage over logical/extended partitions, specifically, say in the field of performance? It would seem a little odd to me if they did, but at the same time, I don't think I would be too surprised if this was true...
    When I find myself burried in errors, Windows Help appears to me; speaking words of wisdom, Reboot!

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    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    I wondered that myself not too long ago, so installed Fedora twice... One as primary, one in an extended. I didn't use any type of benchmark testing, just used a SWAG *. I don't do anything really CPU intensive, but all the same I can't say that I noticed any loss of performance or speed in DVD playback of playing games.

    * SWAG = Scientific Wild Ass Guess
    Jay

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  3. #3
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    Well, I do video rendering benchmarks with glxgears, so that's accurate enough for me! I just thought that if there was anything, it would be liekly to be a certain, specific thing, like lots of tiny files, or one huge file, or some other oddity that might make any differences show up if there were any.
    When I find myself burried in errors, Windows Help appears to me; speaking words of wisdom, Reboot!

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Once the OS is booted, whether or not the partition it is in, or that the data is in, is primary or extended should not matter in the least. Consider it a linked list. The entry to the extended partitions in the primary partition table is just a pointer to some location on the disc. There, the loader reads the extended partition table and takes it from there. So, at boot up there is an additional disc seek + 1 sector read going on. Time delta? Probably around 10ms. I can't even think that fast!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    OK, that makes sense. I just wanted to be sure!
    When I find myself burried in errors, Windows Help appears to me; speaking words of wisdom, Reboot!

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    One of the things I like about these forums, is that if one is blowing smoke (unknowingly, of course), someone will set you straight! Given the complexity of all these systems, one cannot be expected to know everything, or remember it correctly even if once known...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #7
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    You are completely right, sir

    At initialization time it takes a couple of extra operations, while looking for your root file system. But while operating, linux access these devices the same way, it doesn't really matter the type or partition (even more, you could even format the raw device without partitioning it and use it as well).

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