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Hey all, I currently have Windows Vista installed on my machine. I have burnt an Ubuntu 9.04 LiveCD and will be installing it very soon. My goal is to dual ...
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  1. #1
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    Linux, Vista Dual Boot - Sharing Documents / Files?


    Hey all,

    I currently have Windows Vista installed on my machine. I have burnt an Ubuntu 9.04 LiveCD and will be installing it very soon. My goal is to dual boot with Vista and Ubuntu.

    However, I have a lot of documents, pictures and music that I would like both Vista and Ubuntu to be able to access. For example, when I boot up Vista, I want to be able to open my documents and display pictures. When I boot up Ubuntu, I want to be able to do the same thing.

    How should I go about doing this? I figure I must create some kind of hard drive partition that is accessible by both OS's but if someone could give me a detailed explanation of how I actually do this, it would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!

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    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Jay

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    So let me get this straight.

    After partitioning my hard drive, I will have a Windows partition, a root partition for Ubuntu, a home partition where I will keep all my files, pics and music and a swap partition for extra memory. Then, I can have Vista access the home partition of Ubuntu?

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    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    You got it.
    And you can mount the Vista partition to access your Windows files while running Ubuntu.
    Jay

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  6. #5
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    I suggest you keep the shared data on an ntfs partition and mount this in linux using the ntfs-3g drive, this will allow read/write from either OS. I would not give Windows access to Linux partitions - ever.
    You can keep the shared data in the windows partition or create a separate data partition with an ntfs format.

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    So I'll have a Windows partition, an Ubuntu partition, and another partition for all my data?

    I apologize for my questions but what exactly does "mounting a partition" mean?

    Do I mount my Ubuntu partition so I can access my data with Ubuntu and Vista?

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    Mounting a partition is accessing it to be able to use it in linux. It is different terminology. In Ubuntuif you click on your home directory, the small panel on the left shows the other partitions. If you click on one all files are shown. That means that it is mounted. To unmount it in order to reboot and go to Windows, right click it in the panel on the left and you will see unmount option. Always do this before shutting down, because it will keep the partition from being corrupted.
    Registered Linux User #420832

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    Cool it's simple

    hi,
    see it very simple process.i recently installed fedora10. u just do one thing. u download " ACRONICS DISK DIRECTOR"and create one partition of size more then 3 GB,preferably of 10 GB.then delete that partition (through acronics).so u will have 10GB free space.now install ubuntu in that FREE SPACE. and wallah you are done !!!!
    ubuntu GRUB will autometically set ur system for dual boot.so dnt worry.
    and in the matter of ur FILES.u can save them any where else then ubuntu partion.just dont save ur files in ubuntu partition bcoz,ubuntu will b able to access VISTA partition but vista wont access ubuntu partition.
    so just save ur files any where on disk.OK?
    wish u best of luck....
    and Welcome to Wonderful World of LINUX..........

  10. #9
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarehunter View Post
    So I'll have a Windows partition, an Ubuntu partition, and another partition for all my data?

    I apologize for my questions but what exactly does "mounting a partition" mean?

    Do I mount my Ubuntu partition so I can access my data with Ubuntu and Vista?
    I suggest you have a Windows partition (usually ntfs format), a partition for data you want to share between Windows and Linux (ntfs format), a Linux root partition (usually ext3 format), a home partition (usually ext3 format). Depending on RAM you may also need a swap partition (if you have more than 2GB RAM you are unlikely to need this.
    You need to be careful when resizing partitions and installing an OS, backup critical data, make sure you select the partition layout you want ... the default Windows and default Ubuntu installation will use the whole drive for the OS

    You must mount a partition in order to read/write data from/to it. You make the information on the partition available for access. You should find lots of info on the net about mounting partitions ... and a few examples of people trying to explain the concept on the forums

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    Just Joined! Gossamer's Avatar
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    I'm not too sure about the ntfs-3g reference. I've had a HDD completely go corrupt after writing to NTFS because of it.

    To be on the safe side; I keep a fat32 partition open so Windows and Linux can chat back and forth without any potential harm.

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