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Hi, I installed Linux with Windows and used Partition Magic to repartition and it worked, I could access both OS's. Right now my problem is, my family doesn't know how ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Oct 2004
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    Changing boot sequence


    Hi, I installed Linux with Windows and used Partition Magic to repartition and it worked, I could access both OS's.

    Right now my problem is, my family doesn't know how to use Linux and prefer Windows but GRUB automatically selects Linux on OS choice.

    Now my family not being very good on PC's I am the only one with good knowledge they do not know what is going on and what to do so they panic and press any buttons.

    I want it to load Windows by default and have Linux selectable from GRUB.

    Is there anyway to do this?

  2. #2
    Just Joined!
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    From a root terminal, open /boot/grub/grub.conf with your favorite text editor. And look for this line :

    "default 0"

    Change it to

    "default 1"

  3. #3
    Linux User
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    Jul 2004
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    USA, Michigan, Detroit
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    Depending on your distro the file could be called /boot/grub/menu.lst that is the way SUSE sets up GRUB.
    Long live the revolution!
    Have a nice day.
    If you want real change vote Libertarian!

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  5. #4
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    BTW: Is there any way of giving my user FULL ACCESS with no stupid "file restrictions".

    I don't get this in windows I just get a warning.

    I'd like that in Linux too, but I find myself replacing files through the console which is annoying and slow.

  6. #5
    Linux Engineer
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    Sep 2003
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    Knoxhell, TN
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    1,078
    file permissions are a necessary security measure due to the multiuser nature of *nix..

    and in all actuality, any real OS should have some form of permissions implemented (i think that's from the POSIX standard).. it's those OS's with no such mechanism that are broken...

    if you *really* want to give your user superuser priveleges (which is a *major* security risk), edit /etc/passwd and change his UID and GID to 0.
    Their code will be beautiful, even if their desks are buried in 3 feet of crap. - esr

  7. #6
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    OK, Thanks

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