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Okay, yes, this is another partitions question. Sorry about that. But, I'm still struggling whenever dealing with partitions but I will try to provide enough info so... A) reader is ...
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  1. #1
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    Partitions on Thinkpad T4x


    Okay, yes, this is another partitions question. Sorry about that.

    But, I'm still struggling whenever dealing with partitions but I will try to provide enough info so...

    A) reader is not bored
    B) it's easier to analyze the situation and provide options

    The drive specs are: 120GB drive

    Without further adieu, here is my info as provided on SystemRescueCD and using GParted:

    Please explain or provide options for my Thinkpad T41 HDD (IDE 120GB)

    I started SystemRescueCD and got this when I started up Gparted (/dev/sda)

    /dev/sda (111.79 GB)

    /dev/sda1 /dev/sda5
    63.99 GB 47.80 GB

    Partition FS Label Size Used Unused Flags
    /dev/sda1 ntfs 63.99 GB 4.49 GB 59.50 GB boot
    \/ /dev/sda2 extended 47.80 GB --- --- lba
    /dev/sda5 ntfs App 47.80 GB 3.00 GB 44.80 GB

    Sorry about the formatting and spacing.

    I hope it's legible and understandable (meaning I hope the formatting doesn't cause any problems or confuse).

    I wanted to keep the Windows XP partition or at least somehow keep the configuration of the OS intact but I am wondering what the other ntfs partition is. The hard drive is an upgrade and was not configured by me. The OS was cloned so what is there is not done by me. But, I wanted to maintain the XP OS without having to re-install. Not sure if that was a wise move but hopefully it's somewhat understandable. I'm not sure what my options are now but hopefully, I can look at some options that don't require a re-install or not too much change except for resizing the partitions and creating new ones after an ntfs partition.

    I welcome all suggestions.

    I was wondering if it would be good to have something like:

    XP NTFS 30 GB
    Linux swap
    Debian / sidux EXT3
    K/Ubuntu EXT3
    Fedora 11 EXT4 ?

    I am not sure how to arrange the partitions, though or where to put swap. I placed swap after my Windows install on my desktop. Should I do this again on my laptop or where should I place it?

    Some people say it should be in the middle of the drive, though? Then?

    How large should the Linux partitions be? I usually have one partition per distro. Is this okay or wise? I understand some users recommend having a separate Home partition. I just didn't want to veer into complications. I'm already not familiar with partitions but I'd like to learn including using the Terminal more.

    Anyway, I hope this wasn't too boring.

    Btw, I try to keep data on a separate drive such as an internal drive in an enclosure. So, I thought I might not need a separate /data partition. What do you think? Is it okay to access data from another drive? I thought it would be fine but would like opinions.

    Thanks for reading and I appreciate all replies, recommendations and advice.

  2. #2
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    Well, these are the partitions:
    Code:
    /dev/sda (111.79 GB)
    
    /dev/sda1                    /dev/sda5
    63.99 GB                    47.80 GB
    
    Partition     FS         Label    Size        Used        Unused        Flags
    /dev/sda1     ntfs             63.99 GB     4.49 GB      59.50 GB     boot
    \/ /dev/sda2    extended        47.80 GB    ---         ---            lba
    /dev/sda5    ntfs         App    47.80 GB    3.00 GB     44.80 GB
    Sorry about the formatting and spacing.

    I hope it's legible and understandable (meaning I hope the formatting doesn't cause any problems or confuse).
    If you surround this kind of data with "code" tags, it will look better.

    The first thing to do, is to determine what the /sda5 partition is for. It says that it is an extended partition, but I didn't know that Windows could even do this! It is done when creating more than 4 partitions on a disk. It could be mounted on Windows. It has the name "App", does that sound familiar? You may want to look into the Windows Disk Management program to see what it tells you. It can be accessed through the Control Panel:

    Start-->Settings-->Control Panel-->Performance and Maintenence-->Administration Tools-->
    Computer Management-->Disk Management (click on this)

    Does it say anything about it's mount point? Maybe a folder, listed in the Volume category. You will want to save any data on this partition that you want to keep. Then you can delete the partition. You will also want to delete any unneeded files in the Windows main partition.

    After removing and/or saving everything you needed to, then empty the Recycle Bin. Back in the Disk Management program, right-click on the C: drive and select Properties. Click on the Disk Cleanup button and have it delete as much as you feel comfortable with. Look at the size of the options, it may help you decide. I don't believe that it will delete any required system files, so you should be safe.

    Now go back into the Computer Management program, select Disk Defragmenter. Run the defrag on the C: drive several times. You want to get all of the files to be compacted towards the beginning of the disk. I have found that you need to do it 2 or 3 times.

    You now should be able to safely resize the Windows C: partition. This will have to be done with the Linux installer, or better yet, use gparted.

    If you still haven't found what the sda5 partition contains. You may be able to by using a Linux LiveCD. There you can mount the partition, if it doesn't do it automatically. I would recommend a LiveCD from Ubuntu, Fedora or Knoppix.

    This is getting to be a long post, so I'll stop here. Don't repartition anything until you can determine the contents of sda5. It also may be best to delete it using the Windows Disk Management program, so Windows won't be "disturbed" by it's removal. Post back when you have more info or more questions.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by penguin2 View Post
    Btw, I try to keep data on a separate drive such as an internal drive in an enclosure.
    It just occured to me. The sda5 entry may be the the mount point for your external drive. I could be wrong about this, tho. Is the drive formatted as NTFS? Try booting up without it attached, and see if it still is listed.

    EDIT: Nevermind. I should have looked closer at the partition sizes. Both sda1 and sda5 total up to be close to the 120GB that the drive actually is.
    Last edited by waterhead; 06-14-2009 at 01:27 PM.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

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  5. #4
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    Well, in Computer Management/Disk Management, it looks like two large partitions, one is listed as 'C' and the other 'E' as 'D' is the CD/DVD Drive.

    The 'E' drive or partition is a bunch of drivers and other files. It looks rather messy.

    Edit: For e.g., there are files/directories for a T30 and A30? I am not sure what the contents are exactly but I would guess there are files/directories for other models of Thinkpads (or even other laptops) than just my own (which is a T41).

    I probably made a mistake when I replaced the hard drive. I moved to a larger drive for this Thinkpad but I just let the 'technician' do whatever. I wanted the previous drive's Windows OS cloned but it had a Linux OS also on it and the guy told me he couldn't clone that drive. He doesn't use Linux and didn't know how, I guess? I would have been satisfied if he just cloned the Windows OS partition but I don't know if that was doable. He used one of his other drives so who knows what's there. Windows was installed so that was cloned to the new drive I have now.

    It appears messy to me with a lot of stuff that probably doesn't need to be there but I don't know how to tell or differentiate between all the directories and files.

    How hard is it to re-install Windows XP on a Thinkpad? I'm wondering if I should do that.

    That is what I was trying to avoid by having the previous drive (the one that came with the laptop when I bought it) cloned or at least, the Windows OS that was on the drive. But, now, how do I 'merge' the partitions and shrink it? There is '92% free space' on both partitions so maybe I CAN merge the two and shrink it or maybe just shrink both partitions and leave them as is?

    I could leave the content alone and just shrink both partitions with GParted?

    I like the customization job the previous owner did which is why I wanted to keep that Windows OS configuration. I guess I should have told the guy but that is what I thought he was going to do. I guess the fact Linux was also installed on the drive threw him for a loop and he didn't want to deal with it. It was easier to use one of his own drives that has only Windows. Also, he didn't know what to make of the Grub boot loader so I'm sure he gave up with that and went with his own drive.

    The other reason I didn't want to 're-install' is that this version of Windows has extra utilities and programs on it and I didn't want to mess with that.

    I was wondering what the best option is. Either keep as is and re-size the two partitions OR is there some way I can 'save' the programs and utilities on the current setup of XP and install them on a new install of XP?

    Which option is better or easier?

    With all that said, based on what is chosen, how would I proceed with a Linux install? What if I want to boot more than one distro? This is getting hard? Or maybe I'm making it hard?

  6. #5
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    Since it is very small, size wise, you can just copy everything from the E: drive to the C: drive. You may want to make a separate folder for it, to keep it apart from the other files. You will most likely never need it.

    You can then delete the E: partition and see if Windows still boots OK. If that is fine, then you can proceed to install Linux.

    If you plan on installing more than one distro, then you can plan this ahead of time. Your original partition plan was OK, but I would make one partition for /home too. Each distro can use the same /home partition, but you must use different user names for each distro. Each distro will want to install grub. This is OK too, but the last one installed will be the one you will be using. So make this the distro that you intend to keep around the longest.

    As for size. that is a matter of opinion. If you will use Windows the most, give it the most disk space. 30GB is enough, but since the total of the two disks is only 7.5GB, 20GB would be enough. Here is a rough guideline:

    Windows - 30GB
    swap - 2GB
    /home - 30GB
    Debian - 20GB
    *buntu - 20GB
    Fedora - 20GB

    You will need to keep tabs on the partitions, so that they don't fill up.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  7. #6
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    I just realized that you have two threads going on the same subject. And i posted replys in both of them!

    It is against forum rules to make duplicate posts with the same question. I am closing this thread. You can continue this in the other thread:

    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/lin...fi-2200bg.html
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

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