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i have an old pc with a 15 gig hd. right now i have a 5 gig partition, with puppy linux running on it. the other 10 gigs are unpartitioned ...
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  1. #1
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    wanting to install multiple o.s.


    i have an old pc with a 15 gig hd.

    right now i have a 5 gig partition, with puppy linux running on it.

    the other 10 gigs are unpartitioned space.

    ideally, I would like to have 3 o.s. on the p.c.

    *puppy linux, because its an old p.c. and puppy runs well.
    *ubuntu linux, because I know the most about ubuntu linux(vs other distro's).
    *windows xp (black), because there are some programs that are only available on windows.

    I know how to partition, and i know how to install an os on to a partition.

    but i don't know how to set up the start up, so it will ask what o.s. do i want to run.

    i know that puppy linux is using GRUB to boot. but i really don't know much about GRUB, besides that fact that it has to do with booting, and i think i need to configure it somehow, to run a multi o.s. system

    can anyone tell me, at least, what to do (during and/or after) installing ubuntu on to another partition, to make it so I'll be asked what o.s. to boot with when i start up.

    (if someone knows how to include windows xp black too, that would also be nice.)

  2. #2
    Linux User vickey_20's Avatar
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    15gb will be too less for 3 OS
    Only if I could understand the man pages
    Registered Linux user #492640
    OS: RHEL4,5 ,RH 9,Ubuntu

  3. #3
    Linux Guru bigtomrodney's Avatar
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    It might be a bit tight as vickey_20 has said. An Ubuntu install is about 2-3GB anyway, and you'll still need room for running and data storage. I'd say either give the rest of the free space to one distro or just stick with one operating system only.

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    my main goal right now is just to learn installing o.s.'s

    i'm also trying to learn about different distros'

    This is just an old computer that I'm trying things out on.

    I Have ubuntu and puppy linux both running now.

    The problem i had before was that I installed ubuntu first then tried to add puppy linux.

    but this time i installed puppy first, and then installed ubuntu second, and during the ubuntu installation there was an option to install side by side.

    i still would like to know if there are any special steps i need to take to have windows installed too. Even if its not a good idea, even if i completely overload this computer and it explodes, its no big deal, its just an old computer that i'm experimenting with.

  6. #5
    oz
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    If you are interested in learning about GRUB and how it works, check this tutorial... it's easy to understand and is one of the best that I've seen:

    GRUB bootloader - Full tutorial

    You can get a lot more detailed information should you need it from the GRUB Manual:

    GNU GRUB Manual 0.97

    As for special steps, be sure to install Windows first because it will overwrite the GRUB bootloader if you install it after Linux. Otherwise, you need to tell GRUB where to find each kernel that you want to boot.
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar View Post
    As for special steps, be sure to install Windows first because it will overwrite the GRUB bootloader if you install it after Linux. Otherwise, you need to tell GRUB where to find each kernel that you want to boot.
    Exactly right. The best idea is always to install Windows first, and then put your Linuxes on after that (Puppy then Ubunutu). If you try to install Windows in the space you have left, you will find that it will set up its own MBR and the other o/s images will "disappear". It's a messy procedure to get them back again.

    In all truth I wouldn't recommend this. I would get another hard drive. For an old experimental PC you should be able to pick up a 20GB+ IDE drive for peanuts. I'm assuming that speed and age are irrelevant here, as the tone of your posts seem to indicate that your project is simply to understand the install/boot process.

    Process I would follow (assuming that you have no data in your Linux images that you want to keep. If you do, back them up to USB/DVD or such like first):

    1. Install new hard drive.
    2. Put Windows on the new hard drive.
    3. Re-install Puppy on an image that's half the size of the original hard drive.
    4. Install Ubuntu in the remaining space on the original hard drive.

    The boot loader should then give you the option of all three o/s images when you boot the machine.

  8. #7
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Since you want to learn to install OS then you can try installing Windows with Linux installed (normally as others have already said install Windows first is easiest).

    To install Windows with Linux already installed you need to:-
    free space at the start of the drive for Windows to install to
    install Windows
    decide if you want to use Grub or Windows bootloader as your main bootloader then boot from a live CD and either
    a) install grub to the MBR (and add entry for Windows chainloading)
    b) install grub to each boot/root partition boot record and
    i) create copy of each boot record
    ii) copy them to Windows partition
    iii) modify Windows bootloader to use them

    Make things as easy or as challenging as you like

    Example for using Windows bootloader here ... good luck.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhythmiccycle View Post
    i have an old pc with a 15 gig hd.

    right now i have a 5 gig partition, with puppy linux running on it.

    the other 10 gigs are unpartitioned space.

    ideally, I would like to have 3 o.s. on the p.c.

    *puppy linux, because its an old p.c. and puppy runs well.
    *ubuntu linux, because I know the most about ubuntu linux(vs other distro's).
    *windows xp (black), because there are some programs that are only available on windows.

    I know how to partition, and i know how to install an os on to a partition.

    but i don't know how to set up the start up, so it will ask what o.s. do i want to run.

    i know that puppy linux is using GRUB to boot. but i really don't know much about GRUB, besides that fact that it has to do with booting, and i think i need to configure it somehow, to run a multi o.s. system

    can anyone tell me, at least, what to do (during and/or after) installing ubuntu on to another partition, to make it so I'll be asked what o.s. to boot with when i start up.

    (if someone knows how to include windows xp black too, that would also be nice.)
    Please more information: How much RAM, CPU rate,..
    Yes it is possible.
    Doyou have important data (please save) or can you start from the beginning?

    Best way woul be to have:
    a primary partition
    5 GB ntfs for XP
    a secondary primary partition including virtual partitons
    5 GB ntfs for data
    5 GB ext 3 for ubuntu
    4 GB ext3 for Puppy
    a third primary partition
    1 GB linux-swap


    Don't worry I am wiling to help you and it isn't difficult at all.
    The only difficult things are you have to know how to read and to concentrate.
    Concerning Grub:
    There are two ways:
    Grub in the MBR (it is the most common way now)
    Grub to the suoerbootblock of the Linux-Partition and nt-bootloader in the MBR (the traditional way, more complicated but also more secure)
    If you really want to leard and to understand I recommend version two=

    If you want we can do a step to step session.

  10. #9
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by computerophil View Post
    Best way woul be to have....

    ....Concerning Grub:
    There are two ways:
    Grub in the MBR (it is the most common way now)
    Grub to the suoerbootblock of the Linux-Partition and nt-bootloader in the MBR (the traditional way, more complicated but also more secure)
    If you really want to leard and to understand I recommend version two...
    Partitioning is down to personal preference there is no best way

    Why do you think Windows bootloader is any more secure than Grub?

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan183 View Post
    Partitioning is down to personal preference there is no best way

    Why do you think Windows bootloader is any more secure than Grub?


    Sorry, but I don't share your opinion. There is a best way for partitioning.
    First you may have only 4 primary partitions.
    Traditionally one of those is for swap (not all distros can handle a swap in a virtual partition). Also it makes less problems to start with windows => first primary
    one Primary you need for putting virtual partitions into it. ,....

    It's not only me who consider the combination of nt-bootloader for windows and grub bootloader for linux as more secure,
    Even on the German Ubuntu-page this method is described (even if they say this method is for security fetishists and traditionalists)

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