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I am attempting a centos installation and is a newbie to this so I need some assistance. My motherboard supports raid 5 and I have 3 x 250gig drives installed ...
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  1. #1
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    centos 5.3 install help


    I am attempting a centos installation and is a newbie to this so I need some assistance. My motherboard supports raid 5 and I have 3 x 250gig drives installed and the raid setup in my bios when I do the install do I need to do a software raid setup as well or will the installation pick it up automatically

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    Hi charlo
    If your install cannot use the raid it will not prodeed with the install and you should be OK. Depending on the motherboard it may be partly Software Raid anyway, as not all Raid Controllers use Hardware exclusively. You might want to consider a simple install first until you are sure there are no other problems and then do a raid install later, if necessary.
    I use a crontab (run it once a day) to run 'rsync' to a separate spindle and it provides excellent protection against loss of my information, essentially /home. In fact you can use the third 250 Gig as a backup (I use clonezilla live CD) for your OS and save your complete OS with settings. In this way you will accomplish all the security you should ever need. Hope this helps in some way. Cheers...
    Robert

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    thanks for the reply can you maybe point me to a tutorial?

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    Quote Originally Posted by charlo View Post
    thanks for the reply can you maybe point me to a tutorial?
    The following URL seems to be a good example of what is involved in installing CentOS.

    Installation Guide: CentOS 5.1 Desktop | HowtoForge - Linux Howtos and Tutorials

    Under this tutorial choose the manual partitioning (Create custom layout.) option when it comes along in the install. At the point where it says 'Here you can select/edit the partitioning layout.' Choose 'Create custom layout' option. You will see all three drives /dev/sda, /dev/sdb and /dev/sdc (may be hda, hdb and hdc but don't worry about this). We, at this point, are only going to use one of your hard drives for our install. We are going to do our complete install on the first drive sda (hda or whatever). Where it says "If you chose the manual setup, you'll see the following two windows." we are going to intervene and add some new partitions. First we will add a partition (Click New) through the menu option and under mount point add '/' (exclude single qoutes) on it using only 50000MB of space. (Tick the fixed size, which I think is the one already ticked). Tick OK and again add (click New) partition. Next choose another and make its mount point '/home' (no spaces). This is often called 'slash home'. Choose 'Fill to maximum allowable size.' option. Accept by clicking OK. It may ask you if you are satisfied with the partitioning layout. Accept. At this stage after you proceed to the next item you can follow all the rest of the guide to finish your install.
    What this should give you, if all goes well, are two partitons only on the first of three drives. Your / will be on the first of two partitions and your home directory on the second partition. All Linux and Unix systems have, what they call, a root directory; which is where all paths originate. This is / . Directly under this is a home directory where all information for all your users is stored. This is /home . It is prudent to keep these two separate.

    The following URL is a bit of information on 'rsync'.
    Everything Linux - A Tutorial on Using Rsync
    The idea here is to create a filesystem on the second of three drives and 'rsync' all your files from your /home directory to this second drive.

    Some stuff about 'crontab' is at the URL below, there are others.
    Schedule tasks on Linux using crontab

    The third drive can then be dedicated to backups of your OS which is / (excluding /home) so that if you get a corrupted system you can restore it. Clonezilla help can be found at URL Clonezilla .
    Hope this helps and welcome to Linux. Cheers...
    Robert

    Just remember that members of this, and other forums, are here to help.

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