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Hello I'm trying to setup a dualboot with Gentoo Linux and Windows 7. Heres my partitions: /dev/sda1 /boot partition, ext2 /dev/sda2 win7 partition, ntfs /dev/sda3 swap partition, linux swap /dev/sda4 ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Nov 2009
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    Dualbooting Win7 and Gentoo, error


    Hello

    I'm trying to setup a dualboot with Gentoo Linux and Windows 7.

    Heres my partitions:

    /dev/sda1 /boot partition, ext2
    /dev/sda2 win7 partition, ntfs
    /dev/sda3 swap partition, linux swap
    /dev/sda4 root partition, btrfs

    Using Grub, I can boot into Gentoo, but when I'm choosing to boot Windows 7, nothing happens. It just writes the Grub options for that choice, and then it hangs.

    grub.conf:

    default 0
    timeout 30

    title Gentoo
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /boot/kernel-x86_64-2.6.31 root=/dev/sda4

    title Windows
    rootnoverify (hd0,1)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1

    Any ideas? Help will be much appreciated!

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    You have created /boot partition before Windows OS partition. It doesn't work most of the time.
    Did you resize Windows OS partition to create /boot partition?
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    As DC indicated, you need to install Windows first (don't let it take the full drive), then install your Linux OS. The Windows partition will normally be the first partition, unless your hardware vendor also placed a Windows recovery set in partition 1, which it seems yours didn't, or you overwrote it with your Linux /boot partition. So, wipe the disc, reinstall Windows 7, and then install Linux.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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