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I have a bit of a problem. The problem is, on a machine, you can only have 4 primary partitions. sda1 and sda2 are my Vista and Recovery partitions respectively, ...
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  1. #1
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    Dual booting Arch and Vista w/ recovery partition and a swap question.


    I have a bit of a problem. The problem is, on a machine, you can only have 4 primary partitions. sda1 and sda2 are my Vista and Recovery partitions respectively, which eliminates two of my primary partitions already. I myself have never used logical partitions, and was wondering if any of the partitions the Beginner's Guide recommends (/, swap, /var, and /home) could be made logical, and if I even need a swap partition. Thanks in advance for your replies and suggestions.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    Swap no, the rest yes. But you can make a swap file instead of a swap partition.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    I should have read more closely. You do not necessarily need swap, depending on how much RAM you have. And depending on whether you need to be able to suspend the computer. You need enough swap to hold everything in RAM if you want to suspend. I don't use swap on my netbook to reduce writes to the SSD drive.

    You also don't necessarily need a separate /var partition. Most people for desktop systems just do a separate /home.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forums azrael_

    I use logical partitions for swap, home, data, var, and root partitions without issues.
    I have found it is best to leave recovery and Windows partitions as logical partitions at the start of the hard drive.
    The requirement for swap depends on how much memory your system has, if you intend to use suspend to disk, and what you intend using your system for. Usually swap is 2xRAM up to a maximum of 1GB - but for servers you may want a different approach, and suspend to disk requires swap to be larger than RAM.
    I have also been advised the boot or root partition should be a primary partition. So my approach would be
    sda1 recovery partition (leave where it is)
    sda2 Windows partition (shrink to make room for Linux)
    sda3 Linux root partition (if you have space 12 to 20GB)
    sda4 extended partition containing logical partitions with everything else.
    Order of logical partitions is not significant.

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