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i have tried ctrl+alt+f2 nothing happened i still got the message Red hat linux cd was not found i don't know hoe to copy files in dos prompt i formated ...
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  1. #11
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    i have tried ctrl+alt+f2
    nothing happened
    i still got the message Red hat linux cd was not found
    i don't know hoe to copy files in dos prompt
    i formated the hard drive so their is nothing on it

  2. #12
    Linux Newbie
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    can you boot from cd or is your comp too old?
    Cry out for freedom! Cry out for Linux!

  3. #13
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    I can boot from the cd
    but i decided a floppy drive is easyer to boot from
    i have this windows 98 recovery cd that boots from the cd automatically
    my computer is pretty old
    my be i should try an older version of red hat linux like 7.3 or 7.2

    P.S.
    but it should still work
    because i ran windows xp
    for two years

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  5. #14
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    the booting and installing from CD is definately the easiest method.

    Don't be worried about loosing your existing Windoze, as the install procedure asks before doing anything damaging.

    This still, however, leaves the question as to why you can't get the CDROM recognised by the boot diskette method. It looks, from what you're saying that your CDROM is attached (via an IDE ribon cable) to the second IDE socket on your motherboard and the jumpers set on the back of the CDROM (just next to the ribon cable) have been set to Master.

    [an aside, IDE has a concept of master and slave, in that you can have two devices plugged into each IDE socket, via a ribbon cable, and one of them will have to be set as master while the other has to be slave. If there is only one device plugged into the ribbon cable (either connector), you can set it either as Master, or as Cable select, which will make it master]

    If this is so, then the coorect device name is /dev/hdc, which is what Linux is saying that it can't open. This is worrying. Can you have a quick look (either take the cover off or look in your BIOS screen - either Del or F2 pressed just after booting) and see if this is correct. If not (ie. it is not attached as the Master on the second IDE cable), then try the technique of putting "linux crom=hdX" at the boot prompt.

    As to using an older version of Linux. No. Linux is backwardly compatible and Redhat 9 is a good choice for such a "small" PC (sorry, but contrary to what people say, size does matter ).

    So, to summarise, try booting with your first install CD. If that works, then select the text install, as it may struggle a bit doing the graphical install (RAM is a bit small). The LT modem will need you to do a bit of extra work (see the turuorial in this site about Winmodems).

    One last thing, partitions. Do you understand that you will need two separate partitions for your Linux (this is in addition to any partitions that you have Windoze installed on). There needs to be a main or root (/) partition plus a swapper partion (this should be about 2 and a half times the size of your RAM).

    Oh, and another "last thing" , Linux will install (on your MBR I suggest) a boot loader (suggest you use grub) that will give you access to all operating systems (Linux and Windows).

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

  6. #15
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    I'm sorry i dont get what your trying to say
    i am a newbie at master and salve for cdroms
    I don't know which jumper to change in the back of the cdrom
    Which is the IDE socket ?

    Don't get "If there is only one device plugged into the ribbon cable (either connector), you can set it either as Master, or as Cable select, which will make it master] "

    Sorry for being a pain in a#$:drown:


    P.S i formated my hard drive because i just want Linux to run by itself

  7. #16
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    if you watch your pc just after you press power and it finishes the memory test it should tell you what drives you have attached. this ismine

    primary master: wd(something) - this is my first hdd
    primary slave: none
    secondary master: generic 36x cdrom - this is my cdrom
    secondary slave: fujitsu(something) - this is my caddy hdd

    can you post what yours says

    oh and the bits in brackets is where i cant remember model nums
    Cry out for freedom! Cry out for Linux!

  8. #17
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    since i formated my hard drive
    all it says operating system not found
    this computer is realy pissing me of
    may be i should switch back to windows?

  9. #18
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    i highly recommend that you try to boot from cd and install.
    Cry out for freedom! Cry out for Linux!

  10. #19
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    I had a similar problem while working on a friends computer it would boot from the CD but then not be able to find the install media on hdc. I discovered the problem was the single HD was installed on IDE 1 and the CDROM was installed on IDE 0. Once I switched this to the sane configuration of HD master on IDE 0 and CDROM master on IDE 1 it all worked fine.
    Long live the revolution!
    Have a nice day.
    If you want real change vote Libertarian!

  11. #20
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    sorry, didn't mean to confuse you. I think I jumped in a bit too deep for you, at the moment.

    So, power your PC on. It will do the usual Pre Operating System Test (POST) - ie. count up your RAM etc. . At this stage I want you to go into your BIOS setup screen. This is done by pressing a key just after your PC has stopped counting the RAM. The key to press depends on the PC that you're running and what BIOS it has. The key to press will be shown on the first or second screen that the PC shows at power up. Common ones are the Del (Delete) key or the F2 (function 2 key along the top of you keyboad). So, press , and keep pressing the appropriate key til you get your BIOS scren (probably blue with white text).

    Now, using the cursor arrow keys (your mouse won't work ) navigate yourself through these text only menus and screens til you find the one that shows your hard disk and CDROM. Make a note of what it (the BIOS) says about them. Now use the Esc (escape) key to get out of the BIOS (it's okay to say, if prompted, that you want to Quit the BIOS without saving any changes. If you get lost, just power off the PC.

    You will now have the information about your PC's hard disk and CDROM.

    Now either use this info to try the "linux hdX=cdrom" (described earlier) or boot using the first CD of your installation set.

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

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