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can't create /etc as a partition while installation.... While installation of linux flavours like RedHat and Ubuntu, we tried to create a partition of 500 MB. We wanted this partition ...
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  1. #1
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    can't create /etc as a partition while installation


    can't create /etc as a partition while installation....

    While installation of linux flavours like RedHat and Ubuntu, we tried to create a partition of 500 MB. We wanted this partition to be mounted as "/etc". But the installation menu didn't provide any option of "/etc". Still we manually entered "/etc" and clicked on proceed and we received error message saying "Cannot create" or "Cannot mount such partition"

    So can anyone explain why the installer doesn't go forward after creating a "/etc" as new partition.

    As we understand the boot process, /etc/ consist important files which are require for the process. Once the kernel is fetched in the RAM (primary memory), it reads the partition table, where it gets the entire structure of partitions. From this table kernel can understand where is /etc/ and other files. So ideally it should allow us to create a new partition and mount it as "/etc".

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    Apparently, this is very difficult because the system
    needs files in the /etc directory very early in the boot process.

    Mounting /etc from a separate partition - Ubuntu Forums

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Don't create a separate partition for /etc. The installer will create it in the root / partition. As rcgreen said, /etc is needed very early in the boot process because it contains all the scripts and configuration files needed to boot the operating system. You can create a separate partition for /usr, /var, /tmp, etc, but you need to leave /etc in the root file system partition.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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