Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 9 of 9
Hello, I want to have the smallest Linux possible. I need only basic stuff and X (no window managers, no nothing). Can somebody please tell me what I need (the ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    6

    Small Linux


    Hello,

    I want to have the smallest Linux possible. I need only basic stuff and X (no window managers, no nothing). Can somebody please tell me what I need (the basic stuff)? ThanX in advance,

    JVFF

  2. #2
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Norway, Asker
    Posts
    267
    use a floppy-distro or maybe LFS?

    but why install xfree when you are not going to have a wm?

    good luck

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    796
    I recommend you to install a basic Linux-installation first and then remove and disable support you dont need. Think its the best approach that everything is working and then disable stuff, then fixing stuff that dont work because you have stripped your installation to much from the beginning. Of course the most irrelevant software can be removed in the installation.

    Regards

    Regards

    Andutt

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    I must agree agree with Kriss; use gentoo or LFS and work your way up from nothing to what you want.
    But X without any WM? Didn't you mean desktop environment?

  6. #5
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Norway, Asker
    Posts
    267
    I have allways thought that wm was the same thing as desktop enviroment?

  7. #6
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    Most certainly not! Examples of window managers are sawfish or twm. Desktop environments are whole environments like GNOME, KDE, Enlightenment, etc.
    A window manager handles the positioning and resizing of top-level windows and similar functions, while desktop environments (or at another level, display managers) handles your entire logged in environment, and often the programming environment for programs designed to work under it.

  8. #7
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Norway, Asker
    Posts
    267
    ah. Thanks for clearing that up

  9. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    6
    Yes, sorry, I did mean Desktop Enviroment. Anyway thanx for all the answers. I'm working on some sort of Bootable CD Game. I checked out an article about that but the installation was too big. I used LFS, but it was also too big. I'll try to cut it down or just add X to a floppy distro. ThanX again,

    JVFF

  10. #9
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    You might not need to add X to a floppy distro. Check out muLinux, it has X built in.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •