Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
Can anyone guide me (step by step) on how I can make my CDRW work in linux? I've got an IDE CDRW and as far as I can remember, I ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319

    CDRW


    Can anyone guide me (step by step) on how I can make my CDRW work in linux? I've got an IDE CDRW and as far as I can remember, I need some correct modules and add a line to grub.conf (or menu.lst).
    The best things in life are free.

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    556
    check out the post installation section of my guide (page 2)
    also, what distro are you using?
    depending on which one you are using you may need to enable scsi emulation on the drive. some software does that for you - like k3b.
    I need more info to help more though.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    Otherwise, there is always the CD-Writing HOWTO on tldp. Just make sure to load ide-scsi and also to pass ide-scsi=hdx to the kernel at boot, where hdx should, of course, be replaced with the Linux IDE name of the CDRW drive. The latter is to prevent the IDE code from claiming the drive at boot, so that ide-scsi can claim it instead.

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319
    Once I use 'ide-scsi=hdc', do I now refer my cd drive as /dev/scd0 for everything?
    The best things in life are free.

  5. #5
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    If you use ide-scsi=hdc, it reserves hdc for the ide-scsi module, by not making the IDE CDROM code claim it. You'll first need to load the ide-scsi module (if you haven't built it into your kernel, that is) to be able to use it with /dev/scd0.

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319
    Well, considering that the module is either builtin or loaded at boot, do I refer my cdrom as /dev/scd0 for everything? For example, would I need to change /etc/fstab so that the cdrom line looks at /dev/scd0 instead of /dev/hdc? Would I have to reconfigure XMMS so that it looks at /dev/scd0?
    The best things in life are free.

  7. #7
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    Indeed. One IDE drive can only be used by one userspace interface module. I don't _really_ know why, but that's the way it is. So you'll have to choose between either /dev/hdc _or_ /dev/scd0, but once you've chosen, the only way to change it is to either reboot or reload the necessary modules.

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319

    TAO vs DAO

    As I was reading through the guide on "CD-Writing Howto," I came to a question that I couldn't answer. While I know the differences between TAO and DAO, would there be any difference between choosing both these methods to write a data cd?
    The best things in life are free.

  9. #9
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    556
    yes track at once and disk at once are different
    tao would be used more for audio cd's for example as it loads each track one by one into the buffer
    dao loads the entire file into the buffer at once

    at least this is true to my knowledge.

  10. #10
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319
    Actually, I am very aware of the difference between the two methods. Perhaps my question wasn't clear in the previous post so I'll ask it again. Is there a difference between the two methods when writing a data cd?
    The best things in life are free.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •