Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 8 of 8
Hi, I am trying to dual boot linux with 7... with windows installed first, keeping the windows 7 boot manager in control. I heard about easybcd from a friend and ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    10

    Dual booting Windows 7 and Ubuntu 10.04


    Hi,
    I am trying to dual boot linux with 7... with windows installed first, keeping the windows 7 boot manager in control. I heard about easybcd from a friend and decided to use it... I looked into the documentation, and was planning on following this tutorial:

    neosmart[.]net/wiki/display/EBCD/Ubuntu (sorry, I'm not allowed to direct link - please remove the square brackets )

    but had problems with step 3 as the install process has been updated since it was made, and (being inexperienced) I'm not sure how to do the same thing with the new interface.

    I need help with step 3 of the tutorial:

    photo 2.jpg
    (sda1 is my windows 7 partition, sda5 is the recovery partition that came with my pc, and free space is where i want to install ubuntu - I created it by shrinking C:/ using disk management in win7)

    I already made the free space, but since I did it using windows, do I have to format it to ext3 like the tutorial says? Or will ext4 work (i heard it's better)? This is what came up when i clicked on the format checkbox:

    photo.jpg
    (I filled in all the boxes as shown.. are they all completely right? Then hit cancel as I was too afraid of breaking something)

    If I format it like this, will it just format this partition, or my entire hard drive? I think I know the answer.. but want to be safe Also can I change the size value to 20480, as this is what I shrank c:/ by in win7.. so I am slightly confused as to why it has gone up - I don't want it eating into either the win7 or even worse recovery partition

    Finally, can anyone tell me what to put in the 'device for boot loader installation' box in step 6? I have no idea.. despite reading the instructions twice. This is what disk management looks like from windows 7:

    Capture.jpg

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated
    If you need any more screenshots, please don't hesitate to ask..

    Thanks,
    brighty22

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,864
    Hello and Welcome.
    I think you are making this harder on yourself than you need to. Is there a reason why you want to use the Win boot loader? It would be much easier if you just download the distro want to install and let it do it's thing. Just remember to tell the installer not to touch the Win 7 or Recovery partitions, tell it to use the 20GB partition and install the bootloader to the MBR. If you have any problems with the install, we have a ton of smart people here that can assist you. If you have the Win 7 CD/DVD, you can always restore things if you completely fail.

    To answer your questions:
    do I have to format it to ext3 like the tutorial says? Or will ext4 work (i heard it's better)?
    You can use whatever you like, ext3 and ext4 are the most popular.

    I filled in all the boxes as shown.. are they all completely right?
    Looks good to me.

    If I format it like this, will it just format this partition, or my entire hard drive?
    Just that partition.

    Also can I change the size value to 20480, as this is what I shrank c:/ by in win7.. so I am slightly confused as to why it has gone up - I don't want it eating into either the win7 or even worse recovery partition
    I think the fdisk tool will round the partitions to a certain number but I am not sure.

    Finally, can anyone tell me what to put in the 'device for boot loader installation' box in step 6?
    This is difficult because when you install Linux, it wants to use free space so that it can create it own partition layout like / , /swap /boot. So until you actually get the partitions mapped out we can't tell you what it will be. This is why I said to use the installer to partition the drive, and use the installer to install a boot loader.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    10
    Thanks for your response MikeTbob. It's not that I have anything against linux, but its my first time using it and i want to have as much control as possible from windows... at least for now Also my pc didn't come with any windows restore disks.. but I have backups

    Could I just install it using 'largest continuous free space' (or something similar) and then use EasyBCD to restore the windows mbr?

  4. #4
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,864
    Quote Originally Posted by brighty22 View Post
    Thanks for your response MikeTbob. It's not that I have anything against linux, but its my first time using it and i want to have as much control as possible from windows... at least for now Also my pc didn't come with any windows restore disks.. but I have backups

    Could I just install it using 'largest continuous free space' (or something similar) and then use EasyBCD to restore the windows mbr?
    Yes, 'largest continuous free space' is good, it will create it's own layout and everything. I know you can use Supergrub to restore the Win boot loader but I am not too sure about EBCD.
    Super Grub Disk Homepage
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    If you are a new user then I would suggest you to use Ubuntu's GRUB instead of EBCD. Its really easy to remove GRUB anytime and it works really fine. You won't have to edit any file or tweak anything for dual boot setup. Ubuntu installer will detect Windows OS and setup dual boot itself.
    Last edited by devils casper; 06-18-2010 at 06:27 PM. Reason: typo
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  6. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    10
    I've had another, possibly simpler idea: could I just install using 'largest continuous free space' then on the screen before install, hit 'advanced' and just uncheck the 'install boot loader' checkbox, then when it reboots straight back into 7 (I'm guessing as there is no boot loader), use supergrub or ebcd to add ubuntu to the boot menu? Would this work? Thanks

  7. #7
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    Don't expect that will work. You need to do more than add an entry to a menu, you need the boot files for Grub. Which menu are you using, EBCD? Grub? You should install the bootloader files to the root partition of the Ubuntu partition if you don't want it in the mbr.

  8. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    10
    er.. good guess. no it didnt I overwrote the mbr, and ubuntu didnt boot... but luckily windows did I deleted the ubuntu partitions, so now they are 'free space' again.

    This is what the advanced boot loader options looks like... last time I left it as the deafult (the one at the top). Which one should I pick?

    photo.jpg

    Thanks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •