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Hi, im a newbie linux user. (not complete newbie) im really used to ubuntu now... but i have a doubt now... youtube.com/watch?v=JBfl3oViny8 I referred to this video, to install ubuntu(NOT ...
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  1. #1
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    Question [solved]Dual Booting and Partitioning


    Hi,

    im a newbie linux user. (not complete newbie)
    im really used to ubuntu now...
    but i have a doubt now...

    youtube.com/watch?v=JBfl3oViny8
    I referred to this video, to install ubuntu(NOT on windows partition) and also run windows XP, and im well enjoying ubuntu.
    Currently, i have some hard-disk issues, and i'm going to format the whole hard-disk.
    I will format and repartition using windows xp installer.
    I'm leaving 20 GB for ubuntu.

    So I can install ubuntu in 2 ways...

    1) While re-partitioning, i can leave 20 GB unallocated and later put ubuntu there

    OR

    2) Install windows XP the normal way, and then allocate 20GB for ubuntu using GPART - by shrinking a windows partition. (as shown in video)

    Whats better and more efficient.
    Last edited by sgvaibhav; 06-29-2010 at 02:55 PM. Reason: Put [solved]

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie JosePF's Avatar
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    hello,
    The best practice is the first option because if you pick the second one you should defragment the disk and some partition tools can cause long-term errors.

    I hope this help you

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    Sure it does...
    simple question, and simple reply
    thanks..

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    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Best option is, create partition structure before Windows OS installation, imho. You won't have to go through Resize and defrag stuff.
    Back up and boot up from Ubuntu LiveCD. Open GParted ( Disk Utility package ) and delete all partitions. Create partitions for
    * Windows OS (NTFS),
    * Data Sharing (optional) (NTFS)
    * Ubuntu (ext4 or ext3).

    Install Windows OS and then install Ubuntu.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  6. #5
    Linux Newbie JosePF's Avatar
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    You dont need to boot with livecd and use gparted.
    I think the best way is to directly install windows (which creates partiton structure) and leave 20GB free and then install ubuntu.
    Also if you install Windows after Linux, windows will ruin the linux boot

    Partition structure:
    1) Windows (NTFS)
    2) / (ext3 or ext4)
    3) swap ("exchange area")
    4) /home (ext3 or ext4)
    so you'll have separate user data and system data.

    Regards.

  7. #6
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    I think the best way is to directly install windows (which creates partiton structure) and leave 20GB free and then install ubuntu.
    Best way for me doesn't mean that it will be best for others too. As I mentioned in my last post, it is my opinion only.

    You suggested partition resize and defrag ( option 2 of Thread Starter ) in your first post and I avoid doing that if easier option is available. Anyways, thats my opinion only.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  8. #7
    Linux Newbie JosePF's Avatar
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    sorry devil casper,
    but i said it was better the first choice because sgvaibhav said that he is gonna format and install windows. If he leaves unallocated space for linux it is not necesary to resize. I think they said a little confused or i misunderstood.

    Anyway sorry if i offended you.
    In fact, i started writing in this forum to help and to learn!
    And it's just my opinion too.

    Sorry for confusion
    Regards

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    Quote Originally Posted by JosePF View Post
    You dont need to boot with livecd and use gparted.
    I think the best way is to directly install windows (which creates partiton structure) and leave 20GB free and then install ubuntu.
    Also if you install Windows after Linux, windows will ruin the linux boot

    Partition structure:
    1) Windows (NTFS)
    2) / (ext3 or ext4)
    3) swap ("exchange area")
    4) /home (ext3 or ext4)
    so you'll have separate user data and system data.

    Regards.
    hmmm, still a newbie in linux structure :P (still have not tried to figure out swap space... and the directories such as /home etc etc..)

    Actually, couple of months ago, i was playing around with linux ubuntu gpart and i messed up so much, that it shows me like 6-7 partitions on my harddisk :P
    I attached a screenshot of messed up hard-disk (i messed it up more later).


    This is my current plan...
    Run windows xp installer.
    delete all partitions, do long format (want some good hard drive cleaning) and then set 2 windows partions, and leave 20GB unallocated.
    Then run ubuntu live cd and install linux on that 20GB unallocated space.
    Is this plan neat and good enough?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #9
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    delete all partitions, do long format (want some good hard drive cleaning) and then set 2 windows partions, and leave 20GB unallocated.
    Then run ubuntu live cd and install linux on that 20GB unallocated space.
    Is this plan neat and good enough?
    That's a good plan. Install Windows OS and leave 20GB space for Ubuntu. Start Ubuntu installation and select "Specify Partitions Manually (advanced)" option (screenshot) in Partition Section. Create partitions for Ubuntu ( /, SWAP and /home) and continue installation.
    Or create partitions for Ubuntu before starting Ubuntu Installation. You will have to assign mount_points only.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

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    Do i need to assign swap space and other ubuntu partitions?
    what happens if i just select "guided - use the largest continuous free space" and do like a auto install?

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