Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 8 of 8
I am thinking about buildinga box to be a dvr, so I did a search on myth tv. Back in 2009 Waterhead advised a questioner that he needed to be ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934

    Mythtv: is it difficult to install?


    I am thinking about buildinga box to be a dvr, so I did a search on myth tv. Back in 2009 Waterhead advised a questioner that he needed to be prepared for a steep learning curve to install myth tv. I am a relative newbie, is this still the case, or have newer releases such as Mythbuntu made it easier?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,593
    The installation can easily be done using pre-compiled packages. Most of the major distributions have them, sometimes in a 3rd-party repository. You can even use a MythTV distro, like Mythbuntu, Mythdoora or LinHES (formerly Knoppmyth).

    It is in setting it up that will (at times) frustrate you. MythTV is composed of three basic programs:

    myhtbackend: A backend "server" that will do the recording, and other jobs.
    mythfrontend: A frontend, that connects to the backend, for playing files, etc.
    mythtv-setup: The initial program to configure the capture card, channel scanning, and storage directories.

    The mythtv-setup program must be run first. There are also configuration sections in the frontend, mostly to configure the playback of the recorded files.

    If you are planning on recording and watching HDTV, then you will need a nVidia video card. They are the only manufacturer that has good Linux drivers. I would suggest a 9500GT or better.

    VDPAU - MythTV

    Consult the MythTV wiki often. I originally installed on Fedora, and used a guide that is now included in the wiki.

    Installing MythTV on Fedora - MythTV

    Good luck, and have fun!
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934
    Thank you Waterhead for clarifying that for me. You mention an nvidia 9500 or better video card, are there other minimums I should meet. From what I have read so far, 1 gig or better CPU, 2.2 gig of HD for each hour I plan to record (probably 40 hrs or so), and I forget how much ram (can't seem to find my notes at the moment). I have ubuntu on my desktop, so will probably go with Mythbuntu. I've never used a
    DVR or PVR, so am not sure what I need for the system.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934
    Found my notes. Recommended specs for mythbuntu: 2 Ghz processor (1 min) 2 GB ram, 10 GB HD front end, 160 GB HD back end, nvidia 8xxx 256 MB graphics card, linux supported TV tuner card. Didn't see anything on PSU's, though one poster stated he had a 550 watt PSU.

  6. #5
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,593
    The CPU depends on what you want it to do. Things like commercial flagging and transcoding are big processor hogs. I have a Zotac ION mobo, with a dual Atom processor. When it tried to flag commercials while I wad watching LiveTV, it crashed. I had to delay commercial flagging until the wee hours of the morning, when I am not using it. And Yes you can schedule jobs.

    If you record digital broadcasts, that uses very little CPU. In the USA, HD and SD digital broadcasts are a type of MPEG-2 file, so it basically just dumps the captured broadcast to a file. If you want to record analog, like from cable, that is different. Unless you get a hardware encoding card (Hauppauge PVR150, 250 350), the processor must do all of the encoding.

    One way to avoid having a huge noisy and hot PC in your media or living room, is to split up the frontend and backend. Make a backend with a lot of processor power and hard drive space, and put it some where out of the way, like a basement or closet. Then make a frontend out of something like a fanless ION mobo. These are small, quiet and cool.

    The nVidia GPU chips that I mentioned are for using VDPAU to watch HD video. This is the best solution for smooth video playback. Look at the chart in the link that I posted earlier. It should describe what I am referring to.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  7. #6
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934
    All closets are like Fiber McGee's, stuffed full, so box will have to live in living room. Noise won't be an issue since my wife and I both can't hear well. My daughter says she always knows if we're home, cause the TV is loud enough for her to hear when she gets out of her car.
    As far as what I want to do with it, I'm not sure. I haven't ever used one. My daughter has a box that lets her record different shows and view when she wants, plus skip commercials. I guess I want to be able to look through the listings and record what looks good, then play it when I have time to watch, plus cut out commercials. It would be nice if I could also record 2 different movies playing at the same time.

  8. #7
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,593
    To record two shows, you will need two tuners/capture cards. Don't be fooled by the ones that have both analog and digital tuners in them. These are referred to as 'hybrid' cards, and only one of the tuners can be used at a time.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934
    Thank you for your help and time waterhead.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •