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Hello. Iím no stranger to Linux; however, Iím having some problems I need some help with. Iím attempting to dual boot Windows 7 and Linux (any distro) on another machine. ...
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  1. #1
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    No hard drive detected during install?


    Hello. Iím no stranger to Linux; however, Iím having some problems I need some help with.

    Iím attempting to dual boot Windows 7 and Linux (any distro) on another machine. The machine has an ASUS board, 2 SATA 300 GB hard disks, a 270 GB IDE hard disk, and a DVD-ROM/RW.

    Ok, so Iíve done everything I normally would do with every other machine I have done this on. Inserted the Linux boot media into the CD drive, set the BIOS up to boot from CD and thatís it right?

    Hereís the problem. The boot media works fine and starts the install. Then at some point, states that it canít find the boot media from the CD-ROM. I canít figure this one out. I plugged in a USB external CD-ROM drive and Ė eureka, now the boot media not only starts the install but runs successfully as well. Interestingly enough, if I load the Linux boot media into internal CD-Drive, I can start the install, switch the media to the external drive and have no problems in this regard. This must be a driver issue, right?

    Ok, now on to the next problem, even though I donít understand the first one. When the partitioning step comes along, the install will error out, saying ďno hard disk to install toĒ, or ďno hard disks are foundĒ.

    The BIOS detects all drives in my system, even the IDE hard drive. The two SATA disks are formatted for NTFS, while the IDE disk is blank with no partitions defined Ė this is the intended drive for my Linux installation. I understand that the boot loader will be on the Windows 7 driveÖno problem, but I canít get the installation to detect any drive other than the USB external CD-ROM drive and a USB card reader. I have installed every third party IDE or SATA driver during the install that I can think of, no joy.

    At first I was swearing at Microsoft like you wouldnít believe, but after re-thinking the situation, this problem is operating system independent, I think. Anyone got any ideas? Iíve tried SUSE, Mandriva, and Slackware Ė all with the same results. I must be having a hardware issue, something with the BIOS maybe, I donít know, although it seems to be working 5 by 5. I have never tried to dual boot Windows 7 Ė am I missing something here? Did Microsoft manage to make dual booting even harder?

    Josh

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Check in your BIOS, look for anything related to legacy IDE/SATA support and try toggling that off/on. Go from there and change it back immediately if it doesn't help, lest you forget something and forget about it.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
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    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

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    Thanks MikeTbob…Yeah I’m already kind of on that track…no joy. It’s really strange, I’ve never seen anything like this before, IDE support works fine to select a boot media, then seems to disappear. At some point a generic IDE driver must be loading; how else could the system boot from an IDE CD-ROM? But for that matter, the Linux installation should be able to see all drives in the system, even SATA drives formatted for NTFS, right? No drives are available except those connected via USB according to the installation.

    I have disabled all the fancy stuff in the BIOS, completely turned off the SATA connections, and even increased the IDE detection timeout to maximum (35 seconds)…all with the same result.

    Reluctantly I consulted the motherboard manual and can’t find anything in the manual other than “This motherboard supports Windows XP/64 bit XP/Vista operating systems (OS).”

    It doesn’t actually mean only those operating systems right? I can’t figure it out though. The IDE drives are detected in the BIOS as well as the SATA drives. They BIOS detects all drives during the boot cycle, inserted boot media, such as the Linux install medium, initializes and runs – then wham! No drives are detected, not even the boot media unless the boot media was inserted into the USB external drive from the start.

    As of right now I am going to unplug all USB devices and maybe even disable USB from the BIOS and see where that gets me. After that I may go ahead and flash the BIOS; any thoughts?

    Thanks,

    Josh

  4. #4
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Reluctantly I consulted the motherboard manual and can’t find anything in the manual other than “This motherboard supports Windows XP/64 bit XP/Vista operating systems (OS).”
    I think you can safely ignore that.
    Perhaps flashing the BIOS is the right way to proceed. I can't think of anything else it could be. Is this machine a few years old?
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

  5. #5
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    Well it's certainly not brand new, but maybe 1 or 2 years old. It is an Asus P6T SE.

    Thanks for the help...I haven't had time to mess with it in the last couple of days, but weíll see where I get on the next round.

    Josh

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