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Originally Posted by Xheralt The fdisk info below brings an unrelated question to my mind -- why have three different swap partitions ? As far is Linux is concerned AFAIK ...
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xheralt View Post
    The fdisk info below brings an unrelated question to my mind -- why have three different swap partitions? As far is Linux is concerned AFAIK, swap is swap. It all gets aggregated, and it all gets used, regardless of which distro is booted (including livecds!), it's not used for any sort of persistant storage. I'm only saying this so that you might simplfy your partition structure a little? If there's a real need for separate swaps, *I'd* like to know!
    I agree. I have three installed linux OS, but just one swap . Works just fine.

  2. #12
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    On one desktop, I don't use GRUB anymore.

    I use Super Grub Disk, and let it find all the OS's on my hard drives. I then make a selection from that list. I no longer have to mess around with Grub anymore for that desktop machine. I've never been able to get to make Grub properly select the Linux OS's that were installed on that machine. Thus far, I've found out that this is the best solution for this particular arrangement. I let the computer when booting up, do the work, then I select what was presented to me.

    Cheers!

  3. #13
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    Hi onederer, thank you for your response. I think I have a copy of that disk around here somewhere. Thanks for the reminder. I'm still studying those Grub tutorials.

  4. #14
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    Smile Excellent - just what I thought!

    Take a close look at the entries for PCLinuxOS. They have a GRUB Legacy style device spec in the initrd lines for each of the PCLinuxOS entries. Remove them and it will work - temporarily.

    Where it was:
    initrd (hd0,4)/boot/initrd.img
    for example, change it to
    initrd /boot/imitrd.img
    and assuming everything else is correct - seems to be, it will work.

    There is a section called /etc/grub.d/40_custom. IF you copy or move the PCLinuxOS entries that have been corrected to this section, just before the
    ### END /etc/grub.d/40_custom ###
    line, it will stay put. There is a real file by that name. Edit it and put stuff in it, and GRUB 2 will remember it.

    Now then, to keep this problem from happening again, go into PCLinuxOS and edit /boot/grub/menu.lst, now that you can get in.

    For each PCLinuxOS boot entry, add a root line right after the title line entry:
    root (hd0.4)

    Then on the boot and initrd lines, remove the (hd0.4). Next time the GRUB 2 boot manager runs its probe, it will extract the boot and initrd lines in a format that it can correctly digest.

    I hope this is clear. I have been through all of this, and I could see what was happening. At first I could hand edit the lines to correct them, but then I figured out how to get them to stick, and if I have clearly explained it, you will be able to do it too. In a nutshell, GRUB 2 syntax does not use (hd0,4) syntax, it uses (hd0,msdos5). Don't put that on the boot or initrd lines though because GRUB 2 puts this information elsewhere.
    Brian Masinick
    masinick AT yahoo DOT com

  5. #15
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by onederer View Post
    I use Super Grub Disk, and let it find all the OS's on my hard drives. I then make a selection from that list. I no longer have to mess around with Grub anymore for that desktop machine. I've never been able to get to make Grub properly select the Linux OS's that were installed on that machine. Thus far, I've found out that this is the best solution for this particular arrangement. I let the computer when booting up, do the work, then I select what was presented to me.

    Cheers!
    That may be a great solution, but you don't really learn anything about the way that either GRUB Legacy or GRUB 2 work. When I first started many years ago, I did not understand the GRUB syntax, but I studied it and it was not that difficult to learn.

    Similarly, when the GRUB 2 approach came out, I did the same thing.

    Do you understand what Super GRUB does? IF so, then fine. Also, if you don't really want to understand what is going on, that's fine too. We don't all have to be experts. But I am hoping that at least some people will want to learn how these two boot loaders work. Their syntax may seem odd at first, but if you take the time to pick it apart - and hopefully read up on it, the syntax makes sense, and once you learn it, you will be able to boot all of your systems, even when the entries are incorrect, because you will know how to fix them.

    For any would be systems administrators around here, this information is absolutely essential to know and know well. So I appeal to any who want to learn to dig into how each parameter in GRUB works. For those who have read configuration files before, it won't be that tough. For those not familiar with such things it will take time and learning. Why not start today?
    Brian Masinick
    masinick AT yahoo DOT com

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    I had problems with PCLinuxOS 2010, Along with 7 I installed PCLinuxOs with its own /home, then Kubuntu 10.10 also with its own /home because I know K/Ubuntu finds all the other Distros. When i tried to boot PCLinuxOS I ended up with a Kernel Panic.
    In the end I pasted 3 menuentries in /boot/grub.cfg for PCLinuxOS with different partition values until I got one that worked. It was one lower than what was originally there.

  7. #17
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    OK, I edited /grub.cfg file per directions. I am only able to boot into Pinguy using Grub 2 Disk. When I remove the disk the boot menu only shows PCLinux and Windows 7 and it only boots into a terminal. I've tried Ctrl-Alt-F6 thru F12; F8 shows a flashing dash in the upper left corner and F12 prints a bunch of gobbledegook. I managed to login and tried to access /menu.lst but was denied as "not in sudoers list". I believe I set-up at least 2 users but can only remember 1 and apparently it's not on the list. This problem existed b4 I edited /grub.cfg.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by masinick View Post
    That may be a great solution, but you don't really learn anything about the way that either GRUB Legacy or GRUB 2 work. When I first started many years ago, I did not understand the GRUB syntax, but I studied it and it was not that difficult to learn.

    Similarly, when the GRUB 2 approach came out, I did the same thing.

    Do you understand what Super GRUB does? IF so, then fine. Also, if you don't really want to understand what is going on, that's fine too. We don't all have to be experts. But I am hoping that at least some people will want to learn how these two boot loaders work. Their syntax may seem odd at first, but if you take the time to pick it apart - and hopefully read up on it, the syntax makes sense, and once you learn it, you will be able to boot all of your systems, even when the entries are incorrect, because you will know how to fix them.

    For any would be systems administrators around here, this information is absolutely essential to know and know well. So I appeal to any who want to learn to dig into how each parameter in GRUB works. For those who have read configuration files before, it won't be that tough. For those not familiar with such things it will take time and learning. Why not start today?
    It got to a point that I'm no longer interested in being a Linux mechanic. My bottom line is to get the needed results, as soon as possible. My playing days are over.

    Cheers!

  9. #19
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    OK, I edited /grub.cfg file per directions. I am only able to boot into Pinguy using Grub 2 Disk
    Does that mean the SuperGrubDisk?
    PCLinux is on sda5, correct. Your other partitions are swap(6,8,10) and Ubuntu and PinGuy (7,9).

    When I remove the disk the boot menu only shows PCLinux and Windows 7 and it only boots into a terminal.
    It looks like the PCLinux Grub is now in the master boot record. Did you do this with the SuperGrubDisk? It only boots to a terminal with PCLinux? Can you boot windows 7? What did you log in to to access menu.lst? PCLinux? Need to be root to access, open a terminal and enter su -, then your root password.

    If you do this, remember PCLinux uses Grub Legacy and although it counts drives from zero as does Grub2, Legacy counts partitions from zero while Grub2 counts partitions from one. So the entry that is (hd0,7) in your grub.cfg would be (hd0,6) in PCLinux. You could then try chainloading the Ubuntu/PinGuy partitions:

    title Ubuntu
    root (hd0,6)
    chianloader +1

    Did you get a chance to read the tutorial I referenced above, the particular section has specific steps to take to boot Grub2 from Grub Legacy and vice versa.

    Also, a side note. The above posters are correct about swap. You only need one swap partition. It doesn't matter how many operating systems you have. I would leave them for now because if you delete swap on sda6 or sda8, the partition after that will change numbers and that will mess up your booting.

  10. #20
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    Hi yancek, I'll try to answer your questions. Yes I meant Super Grub Disk 2. I had it here and gave it a try. Yes I believe PCLinux is on sda5. I managed to open and view /menu.lst but couldn't edit it (my mouse had no effect). I tried to manuever using some commands I recalled from a ViM tutorial. Some worked but I wasn't able to enter any text. By using the Super Grub 2 disk I can boot into PCLinux (only in text mode). How do I get to it's GUI? Using Ctrl-F's doesn't get me there. I have scanned the GRUB tutorials. I'll study them more closely. I appreciate your kind assistance.

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