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I am trying to install (going for dual boot) Ubuntu 10.10 64-bit(on D on my PC with Windows 7 64-bit Ultimate(already on C and I have the following questions : ...
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  1. #1
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    Unable to install Ubuntu 10.10 64-bit on Windows 7 64-bit


    I am trying to install (going for dual boot) Ubuntu 10.10 64-bit(on D on my PC with Windows 7 64-bit Ultimate(already on C and I have the following questions :

    1. Installation guide says that I should be connected to the Internet while installing Ubuntu but also states to restart PC and boot from CD. How can I connect to the internet in this case? How can I configure my wired broadband that I use on Windows on Ubuntu Live CD and then proceed from thereon for Ubuntu installation?

    2. I want to specify partitions manually(advanced) when asked to allocate drive space during installation. I have kept my D: drive for Ubuntu and have c,d,e,f drives already. If I use d: for 'root' should I also use another for 'home'(which i am not willing to as e: and f: have data in it and are too big for Linux according to me 180gb each). If I partition D: into two(root+home), what should be the size of root and home partitions if I make then out of Done primary, one logical)?

    Arpit
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    Last edited by ArpitRaj; 12-24-2010 at 06:34 PM.

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    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    1. For most people, wired internet should work out of the box. Just plug in the ethernet cable and it should connect. Or do you have an unusual setup or require a static ip or the like?

    2. You do not need a separate home partition, but many people use one. (This allows you to reinstall distros without touching your personal files, for one.) If you decide to have a separate /home, reserver 10-20 GB for root.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reed9 View Post
    1. For most people, wired internet should work out of the box. Just plug in the ethernet cable and it should connect. Or do you have an unusual setup or require a static ip or the like?
    In Windows 7, I made the connection by going to IE>Tools>Internet options> Connections tab> Add> Broadband PPPoE> Enter username and password provided by my Service provider> and my connection was established

    How can I replicate this in Linux Live CD... What steps should I follow?

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    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    I'm afraid I don't use pppoe, Ubuntu, or their network manager, so I can't be specific, but AFAIK, the network manager applet should be able to walk you through it relatively simply. The applet will be to the right-ish on the top panel.

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    I have successfully installed Ubuntu and I am currently working as' root' user.
    I am unable to add another user using :
    sudo useradd -d/home/newuser -m newuser
    It asks for my 'root' user password but when I press keys nothing comes on the terminal window... How can I solve this problem? Is there an other way?

    Arpit

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    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    It's normal not to see output when entering your password in the shell. It's just a security method, like using **** instead of the actually characters. (But then one could at least guess the length of the password and is less secure.)

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    thnx 4 the answer
    now when I tried deleting that user, its folder got deleted from /home but still appears in the login screen as a login option. Why? How to remove it?

    How can I recover files that I have deleted using 'rm' in shell prompt?

  9. #8
    Linux Guru coopstah13's Avatar
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    you don't, rm is permanent delete, you may be able to recover them with photorec or other tools, but its pretty unlikely

    userdel is command to delete user, it shouldn't show up in GDM

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