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Hi people, I've installed Back Track 4 R2 and the GRUB worked, then I've installed Windows 7 (Home Premium Original) from the Acer recovery... But when i start my computer ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Mar 2011
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    GRUB Loading stage 1.5


    Hi people,
    I've installed Back Track 4 R2 and the GRUB worked, then I've installed Windows 7 (Home Premium Original) from the Acer recovery... But when i start my computer it load the GRUB and then it crashes or it blocks.

    I've tried to load first the IDE1 and then the IDE0 and viceversa but it doesn't work!

    I've an Acer ASPIRE 5551G, AMD Athlon II X2, ATI Mobility Readon HD 5650.

    Please help me, i am on a live CD of BT4

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
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    Oct 2007
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    Tucson AZ
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    Did you use a Recovery CD to access your windows 7 recovery partition to get back a "failed" windows 7 after installing Backtrack?

    Windows will generally overwrite the master boot record on an install which will not allow booting anything else. Don't know how this works with a Recovery partition. Are you saying that you are not even able to boot windows after running the recovery?

    Doesn't seem your windows recovery worked?
    You could reinstall Grub from the Backtrack install CD. Which version of Grub does Backtrack use? Can you get partition information? Use your CD, boot it and enter a terminal as root and run: fdisk -l (lower case Letter L in the command). Make sure both drives are connected and post that information here.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    As yancek mentioned already, Windows OS install doesn't work fine after Linux installation. You have to re-install GRUB.
    Was Windows OS installed already and you just used recovery option to boot it up?

    Boot up from LiveCD of any Linux distro and execute this in Terminal :
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    Post output here.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
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