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Hi all; I've already had 3 OS's on my system: Ubuntu 9.10 - Windows XP SP3 - Windows Vista on my system. My linux (ubuntu) was almost perfect for me ...
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  1. #1
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    My linux OS isn't available after installing Windows XP & Vista?!


    Hi all;

    I've already had 3 OS's on my system:

    Ubuntu 9.10 - Windows XP SP3 - Windows Vista
    on my system.

    My linux (ubuntu) was almost perfect for me (updated, well configured with many installed softwares...)

    I have a 300 GB hard disk that was as below:

    Win. XP on C drive (100 Gb)
    Win. Vista on D drive (100 Gb)
    And 100 Gb of unpartitioned space hosting ubuntu!

    I decided to install Win. XP & Vista again without any change to ubuntu!
    So that, I deleted and formatted C & D drives to install new Win. XP & Vista.
    But after that, I can't access to ubuntu and GRUB is vanished now!!

    Apparently, Windows isn't able to identify all the OS's on system while installing,
    So, the Windows boot manager looses my Linux OS!

    Anyway currently, I have only XP & Vista on my system and don't know how should I revive my previous ubuntu?

    Is there any method to access to linux OR I should install a new ubuntu AGAIN?!!

    Please help, I'm confused!

    Regards.

  2. #2
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    windows installers always overwrite the master boot record. They don't ask if you want to do this nor do they inform you that it is being done. I suspect your Ubuntu install is intact unless you installed one of your windows distributions over it (on the same partition).

    What was your setup previously? Were you using the Ubuntu Grub bootloader to boot all systems?

    Your post seems to indicate you installed xp and then vista, is that correct?
    If so, you can download a program to vista called EasyBCD from neosmart technologies website. With EasyBCD, you will be able to boot your Ubuntu partition.

    Download EasyBCD 2.0.2 - NeoSmart Technologies
    Documentation:
    EasyBCD Documentation Home - NeoSmart Technologies Wiki

    The other option is to reinstall Grub to the mbr which would probably be easier if you have your Ubuntu CD?

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Gr...0from%20LiveCD

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie glene77is's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    . . .
    Were you using the Ubuntu Grub bootloader to boot all systems?
    . . .
    The other option is to reinstall Grub to the mbr . . . if you have your Ubuntu CD
    . . .

    Yancek,

    Here is a copy of the method I have used several times.


    *(: Linux_{Ubuntu}_MBR_Rebuild_info_110321.txt

    ************************************************** *********************
    *(: Grub_Install_Help_.txt

    Usage: grub-install [OPTION] install_device
    Install GRUB on your drive.

    -h, --help print this message and exit
    -v, --version print the version information and exit
    --modules=MODULES pre-load specified modules MODULES
    --root-directory=DIR install GRUB images under the directory DIR
    instead of the root directory
    --grub-setup=FILE use FILE as grub-setup
    --grub-mkimage=FILE use FILE as grub-mkimage
    --grub-probe=FILE use FILE as grub-probe
    --no-floppy do not probe any floppy drive
    --recheck probe a device map even if it already exists
    --force install even if problems are detected
    --disk-module=MODULE disk module to use

    INSTALL_DEVICE can be a GRUB device name or a system device filename.

    grub-install copies GRUB images into /boot/grub (or /grub on NetBSD and
    OpenBSD), and uses grub-setup to install grub into the boot sector.

    If the --root-directory option is used, then grub-install will copy
    images into the operating system installation rooted at that directory.

    Report bugs to <bug-grub@gnu.org>.

    ************************************************** ******


    ************************************************** ******
    from: Nathan729, Ubuntu forums.
    Re: Altering MBR to point to new Partition.
    The simplest solution is to boot from a Live-CD,
    and then repair grub...
    ### Thanks for the idea from Natham729 Ubuntu formum.
    ### Live-CD, Terminal, script Code:
    # MKDIR in RamDrive
    sudo mkdir /mnt
    # MOUNT primary OS in /mnt by reference, change /partition# as needed.
    # My Ubuntu is at (hda0,7)
    # Ubuntu Live-CD sees this as /dev/sda7
    sudo mount /dev/sda7 /mnt
    # INSTALL MBR code pointing to primary OS by reference as /mnt
    sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sda
    #MOUNT other subdir as required
    sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev
    sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc
    sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys
    # UPDATE grub.cfg
    sudo chroot /mnt update-grub
    # REBOOT
    sudo reboot.
    ************************************************** ******
    My Ubuntu is at (hda0,7)
    glene77is

  4. #4
    Linux Guru
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    Yancek,

    Here is a copy of the method I have used several times.
    That's swell! I don't use Ubuntu but maybe someone else will find use for your method.

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie glene77is's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    That's swell! I don't use Ubuntu but maybe someone else will find use for your method.
    Yancek,

    The Post was intended to help Jeremy28, with XP + Ubuntu.
    So, I hope Jeremy28 reads this thread.

    glene77is

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