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Your best bet is to boot with a live/recovery CD/DVD and run fsck -c then - the root file system will not be mounted in such a case....
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Your best bet is to boot with a live/recovery CD/DVD and run fsck -c then - the root file system will not be mounted in such a case.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Your best bet is to boot with a live/recovery CD/DVD and run fsck -c then - the root file system will not be mounted in such a case.
    Is is and embedded system with an ARM microcontroler, It support SD cards and USB Drives but the boot loader "U-Boot" only supports to boot from NandFlash.

    Thanks Anyways.

    I will check to format the partition with flash_eraseall, mount it as JFFS2 and then unpack there a TAR packed filesystem from a running machine. I have read this alternative today in another forum.

    I have seen the pivot_root and switch_root commands, seems to be related, but I can't make them work jet, there is not much info about them.

  3. #13
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    You might be able to remount the root file system as read-only, which will allow you to run fsck on it.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    You might be able to remount the root file system as read-only, which will allow you to run fsck on it.
    Something like that?

    # cat /proc/mounts
    rootfs / rootfs rw 0 0
    /dev/root / jffs2 rw 0 0
    proc /proc proc rw 0 0
    devpts /dev/pts devpts rw,mode=600 0 0
    tmpfs /tmp tmpfs rw 0 0
    sysfs /sys sysfs rw 0 0
    udev /dev ramfs rw 0 0
    /dev/pts /dev/pts devpts rw,mode=600 0 0
    /dev/mtdblock2 /etc/gs/datafiles jffs2 rw 0 0

    # mount -t jffs2 -o remount,ro rootfs
    mount: mounting rootfs on / failed: Device or resource busy


    I have installed another filesystem in another partition, and changed the init seting to mount this second filesystem, then i have mounted the original filesystem, but FSCK does not recognise the filesystem old filesystem to check, I can't give it to him in the parameters, and whitout parameters try to act over the new root filesystem, i have show you the steps followed before.


    Anyways I need to erase that old filesystem to write in his place a new filesystem that I have in a File generated with BuildRoot. So there will not be anymore a filesystem after that step, and I still need a comand to write the file in that partition.

    command flash_eraseall -f format the Nand partition and mark the bad blocks, but the DD command try to write over bad blocks anyways, and if i try to write that file with nandwrite command the filesystem starts but is altered and does not recognice some things in /VAR (the IFSTATE wich controls the network)
    Last edited by lucasct; 08-10-2011 at 09:06 PM. Reason: Added another test

  5. #15
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    Finally I am Erasing the partition, mounting it and unpacking a TAR packed filesystem there, changing the boot settings and rebooting.

    Working at files level is avoiding the bad blocks.

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