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Hello, I currently have Windows XP and was having some problems with viruses so i wiped my hard drive. Well to make a long story short i can't log in ...
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  1. #1
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    Help Installing Linux Ubuntu.. Any help is greatly appreciated!!!!


    Hello, I currently have Windows XP and was having some problems with viruses so i wiped my hard drive. Well to make a long story short i can't log in due to a validation process problem. Windows asks me if i would like to validate. If i click no then it goes back to log in screen. so i tried to click yes to no avail. It still returned me to the log in screen. I'm fed up with windows and would like to install Linux Ubuntu. I have done quite a bit of research into DOS and CMD. I just can't find a straight answer. I can't log on to Windows so i can't run an Ubuntu installation disk. Is there anyway that i can install Ubuntu without having to log on? I do not want to Dual-Boot i'm fine with wiping my entire computer and starting over. I need everything i need to know. i have the Ubuntu .iso file already downloaded on another computer so i have easy access to that. I need any help i can get and a detailed response please. i need to know whether to place the .iso file on a CD or USB. Pretty much walk me through the WHOLE process. THANKS!

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    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by twestmoreland View Post
    i have the Ubuntu .iso file already downloaded on another computer so i have easy access to that. I need any help i can get and a detailed response please. i need to know whether to place the .iso file on a CD or USB.
    Hello and welcome!

    You can check this thread for the proper steps to burn an .iso file containing Linux to disk and then boot your machine with it:

    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/ins...ll-cd-dvd.html

    On most distros, the installation process is automated, so you just need to follow the self-guided install process.
    oz

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    OK. Thanks. but do i need to use a CMD or DOS command to boot the disk? or will it automatically go to the Linux install screen? and should i use a Double layer disk to burn and any suggestions on installation
    ?

    P.S. - Sorry about posting this twice i forgot to post as a reply. :P

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    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by twestmoreland View Post
    do i need to use a CMD or DOS command to boot the disk? or will it automatically go to the Linux install screen?
    You need to make sure your machine is setup to allow booting from a CD-drive, just like you would with any Windows installation CD, then put the install disk in the drive and reboot your machine. If the iso file was burned to the CD disk properly, you should boot into Linux and have an option there to install the OS to your hard drive. Choose that option and follow the self-guided installation menu.
    oz

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    If you are happy with wiping the disc and starting over with Ubuntu, then you don't usually need to log into Windows at all.
    The installation is done by disc (or USB stick), but does require access to the BIOS to make sure that the computer will boot first from the CD drive, or, as necessary, from USB .
    You will also need to have the latest Ubuntu distro already downloaded and burned to disc first, obviously.

    If you cannot boot into Windows to burn an ISO onto a CD, then best bet is to go to a friend's computer and do it from there. Alternative would be workplace or similar. You obviously have access to a computer to write to this forum, so it doesn't look to be too difficult for you.

    The resultant disc allows you not only to install from the disc (just as do Windows' discs), but it also allows you to boot the Ubuntu operating system and run it entirely from the CD. Of course, the files on the CD can't be changed, and the access time for files and programs is greater than it would be if the OS was installed on a hard drive. Best thing is that it allows you to trial the new OS without any changes to your existing hard drive.

    If you have files on the non-bootable Windows drive that you want to keep, then the Live Disc (as it is called) allows you to copy them onto something external, like a USB drive, thereby saving them from permanent deletion when you install a new OS over them. Needs for you to be familiar where Windows hides things too, and how to mount discs, etc. Can be a little tricky at times, and occasionally there are 'permissions' issues too. A little googling will assist you in overcoming any probs here.

    At any rate, it sounds like the virus or whatever it was, has destroyed the data on your hard drive in the place where critical Windows data is stored, ie: the validation bits.
    The is not usually recoverable.
    There is a possibility also that the hard drive has simply got physical damage to the sector where this data is stored. Hard drives don't last forever, the platter spins extremely fast, and the head travels very close to the surface. Any bumping or shock can make the head dip slightly onto the surface and gouge a chasm, so to speak. Drives do have anti-drop damage limitation mechanisms, but nothing is perfect. Data lost in this manner is gone forever.

    You might be able to run some disc utility to check for damage. I have used "Spinrite" for this, with good results. You may need to google for one or ones that you will like.
    The Ubuntu OS does have some good utilities to detect drive data, also to read the drive's SMART data. Using the Live Disc, go System -> Administration -> Disc Utility. You can use this to get an awful lot of data about your hard drive.

    After all this, when you finally install Ubuntu, the initial desktop environment will be the new Unity desktop. This is very different from what you may be used to with Windows, but don't panic.
    You just go to System -> Administration -> Login Screen, click Unlock, then select Ubuntu Classic as default session.
    Log out and in, and it should be back to more familiar surroundings.

    You will also find the default window controls set out like Apple has them, in the top LEFT of the window instead of the top right as used by Micro$oft.
    If you don't like it, then easiest way to alter it is to get "Ubuntu Tweak" (just google it), and go to Window Manager Settings. At the top is where you can set the window control placement.

    Ubuntu Tweak also lets you do a whole pile o' useful stuff too, so it is worthwhile.

    Hope all this helps.

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    Cool

    I'll try to be brief and to the point:
    do i need to use a CMD or DOS command to boot the disk?
    not at all. what you need is to enter the BIOS (basic Input/Output seetings) at boot-up. to do that just look at your screen when you fire your machine up. you will see something like «press <whatever> to enter setup», so press that quickly (or fire it up again if you weren't quick enough).
    Once in the BIOS, have a look around until you find something like "bootup priority". whatever it's called, just make sure you tell the computer to prioritize your Ubuntu media (CD or USB) over the hard drive at bootup (If I were you, I'd burn Ubuntu onto a CD because not all machines can boot up from USB (specially if they're old). use ImgBurn (really good app, google it) or any other app that explicitly allows burning image files --Nero works too, just make sure you choose to "burn image file"-- - DO NOT USE A MICROSOFT APPLICATION TO BURN IT.

    Then just follow the on-screen instructions.

    advice: at some point during the installation it will ask you whether you want to "encrypt my home folder". Tick the box (not necessary, but it's good practice for reasons that don't belong to this thread.

    advice2: try Linux Mint instead of Ubuntu at first. It is based on Ubuntu (so you get all its goodness) but looking more like Windows, so you'll learn quicker. if you do try it, I'd recommend you "install multimedia codecs" when you see the welcome screen (and upgrade to DVD edition if you used the CD one)


    advice3: assume that you will have to learn the linux alternatives to windows applications, it will make your life easier: Gedit instead of Notepad; LibreOffice instead of Microsoft Office; Firefox/Chromium instead of IExplorer; Gimp instead of Photoshop... I'm sure you get the point

    There's a lot more I could say, but I think that'll get you going.
    Last edited by yagolf; 08-26-2011 at 11:02 AM. Reason: didn't like something I wrote

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    Also important - you don't simply copy the .iso file from the computer to a CD. You need a program that can burn an image (the .iso) to CD. If you list the files on the resultant CD, you should see many files, NOT just one file named (whatever).iso

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