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Originally Posted by bflance Older Linux systems had LILO boot manager rather than grub. from what i remember LILO was more "invisible" than grub, it had less messages popping on ...
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  1. #11
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bflance View Post
    Older Linux systems had LILO boot manager rather than grub.
    from what i remember LILO was more "invisible" than grub, it had less messages popping on screen when booting up.
    also using grub is highly recommended, especially when you upgrade Linux kernel.
    grub allows you to use several different kernel configuration and pass arguments and parameters to each kernel - this increases stability of the system.
    I run Slackware 13.37, kernel 3.2.13
    And still need a bootlader.
    LILO does a wonderful job for me... LILO being the default for Slack.
    And believe it or not, LILO will boot multiple distros... no problem.
    Code:
    man lilo
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    Nothing wrong with lilo with respect to multiple boot/kernels etc. The main issue with lilo is that it can fail to boot a large initramfs - there are workarounds however. When I ran slackware for a while I had to install grub 2 as lilo kept freezing randomly on boot.

  3. #13
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Crux uses LILO too. It's used by several distros that emphasise simplicity and speed. LILO is much easier to understand than GRUB or GRUB2. But it won't boot modern NTFS-based Windows systems, whereas GRUB will.

    Actually you used to able to boot Linux without a bootloader by using the dd command to put a kernel directly onto an empty floppy disk. Since it started in sector 1 (where your computer would expect to find a bootloader), you could then boot from that disk. But most modern bioses don't allow you to boot like that for security reasons.
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    I decided to give lilo a spin today in Debian Sid - very simple to configure and no problems so far. (i.e. you don't have to edit three configuration files just to change resolution or get a graphical boot menu).

  6. #15
    oz
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    I always did like lilo personally, and the only problems it ever gave me where those times that I'd forget to run the lilo command right after upgrading the lilo package itself. Of course, that wasn't all that big an issue, but more an easily fixed surprise issue on the next system boot. The main thing is that it did the job pretty well under most circumstances.
    oz

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