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Hi all, I want to install the linux without any bootloader directly booted from kernel. I'm looking for step by step manual to do this.. I know that I should ...
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  1. #1
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    How can I install the linux without any bootloader?


    Hi all,

    I want to install the linux without any bootloader directly booted from kernel.
    I'm looking for step by step manual to do this.. I know that I should make some changes in the MBR to points to my kernel image, but I don't know how..
    is there any manual for this??

    sorry for my poor english

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    tpl
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    welcome to the forum

    SFIK without a bootloader, the system won't boot.

    but if you set the delay to 0, the system boots immediately without
    showing you any bootloader screens

    ps. thought yr english was pretty good--better than many who claim it as first language
    the sun is new every day (heraclitus)

  3. #3
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Welcome to LinuxForums!

    I agree with tpl. Without a bootloader, a system won't go anywhere.
    Unless you are looking to dual-boot Linux with Windows, use the Windows loader but not the Linux bootloader.

    In any case, a bootloader of some sort must be present to actually load the kernel.
    Jay

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    Booting without a bootloader such as Grub.

    Quote Originally Posted by tpl View Post
    welcome to the forum

    SFIK without a bootloader, the system won't boot.

    but if you set the delay to 0, the system boots immediately without
    showing you any bootloader screens

    ps. thought yr english was pretty good--better than many who claim it as first language
    I don't think that you have ever seen Windows needing a bootloader when it is the only OS on the hard drive. That's because it's information is the MBR of the hard drive. And that's what the system looks for when booting Windows.

    So now, if you install Linux into it's own hard drive, and make it bootable using a partition manager, I don[t believe that you would ever need a boot manager. At least that's the way that I've done before. However. I still would recommend that you do use a bootloader like Grub. This way, if you should happen to add another Linux distro to your hard drive, you would be all set to manage that one also. Also, Grub will give you the option to activate Windows, even if it is on a separate hard drive.

    Good Luck!

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie reginaldperrin's Avatar
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    Onederer -> Windows does have its own bootloader, it's just that it is invisible to the user most of the time, rather like GRUB on a single-OS system is invisible. The Windows bootloader is different from Grub. You can easily see it in action if you install two different versions of Windows.

  6. #6
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onederer View Post
    I don't think that you have ever seen Windows needing a bootloader when it is the only OS on the hard drive. That's because it's information is the MBR of the hard drive. And that's what the system looks for when booting Windows.
    The MBR (Master Boot Record) is where Windows automatically installs its bootloader (NTLDR).
    It's not seen because it's a proprietary build, and we don't need to know about it.
    The same deal occurs on OSX.

    Now, you can install a bootloader, like GRUB, to a USB stick. Have the OS itself on the hard drive. Then, you can insert the USB stick upon startup.
    Set the BIOS to boot from USB first and you're good.
    But you're still going to be using some form of loader.
    Last edited by jayd512; 04-06-2012 at 01:48 AM. Reason: typo
    Jay

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    Exclamation I stand corrected!

    Quote Originally Posted by jayd512 View Post
    The MBR (Master Boot Record) is where Windows automatically installs its bootloader (NTLDR).
    It's not seen because it's a proprietary build, and we don't need to know about it.
    The same deal occurs on OSX.

    Now, you can install a bootloader, like GRUB, to a USB stick. Lave the OS itself on the hard drive. Then, you can insert the USB stick upon startup.
    Set the BIOS to boot from USB first and you're good.
    But you're still going to be using some form of loader.
    I stand corrected about a Windows bootloader!


  8. #8
    Linux Newbie glene77is's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onederer View Post
    I stand corrected about a Windows bootloader!
    (ONE)

    I run Linux and M$-XP from a Hard Drive.
    The MBR is M$, so it seeks "ntldr" for bootloader.

    When I boot my M$-XP computer from power-up,
    I present myself with a menu.

    The "Rename Method" of dual booting M$-XP and Linux.

    (1) I renamed the old M$ "ntldr" to become "wxldr.sys".
    (2) I renamed the Linux "grldr" to become a new "ntldr" .
    (3) the M$ bootup MBR control will pass to the grub4dos "grldr" and "menu.lst" code.

    I copied a specially prepared "menu.lst" in place on the SDA1,
    so my bootloader will produce a menu.

    This is the core of the menu.lst code.

    Code:
    default 1
    timeout 33
    
    title ---{ HD Lupu W2 (=find(Mark), load kernel,initrd }
      find  --set-root  --ignore-floppies  --ignore-cd   /MARK-WX
      kernel  /puppy/vmlinuz   pmedia=atahd   psubdir=/puppy
      initrd   /puppy/initrd.gz
    
    title ---{ M$ XP =(find<wxldr.sys>, chainloader<wxldr.sys> }
      find  --set-root  --ignore-floppies  --ignore-cd   /wxldr.sys
      chainloader  /wxldr.sys
    ############################



    (TWO)
    Commonly I boot from a PenDrive, grub4dos and menu.lst.

    I can multiboot to several Linux OS on the PenDrive,

    I can multiboot to several OS on the HardDrive.
    (1) When activating the M$-XP on the HD,
    I chainload directly to the M$ bootloader.
    (2) When activating the Linux on the HD,
    I "kernel" and "initrd" to the Linux core files.

    On the PenDrive, the menu.lst code
    to boot across to the HardDrive M$-XP is:

    Code:
    title \n ==={ M$-XP via HD wxldr}=== \n { pendrive grub4dos: HD map, find, chain wxldr }=
    lock	
    map (hd1) (hd0)
    map (hd0) (hd1)
    map --hook
    errorcheck off
    find --set-root --ignore-floppies --ignore-cd /wxldr
    chainloader /wxldr
    errorcheck on
    ############################

    glene77is,
    Puppy Linux is more then than a barrel of M$ Monkeys

  9. #9
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Step by step using lilo boot loader in a linux root partition. Not in MBR. Then modifying windows ntdlr boot.ini file to boot linux.

    It's old I know. Back when Redhat was at version 4.2.
    How to dual-boot Windows NT/2000/XP and Linux using NTLDR
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  10. #10
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    Hi,

    Older Linux systems had LILO boot manager rather than grub.
    from what i remember LILO was more "invisible" than grub, it had less messages popping on screen when booting up.
    also using grub is highly recommended, especially when you upgrade Linux kernel.
    grub allows you to use several different kernel configuration and pass arguments and parameters to each kernel - this increases stability of the system.

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