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Hello everybody! I just bough a new 2 TB hard disk and I'm wondering, would it be a very wild idea to use GPT instead of MBR? Is there any ...
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  1. #1
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    Question Are GPT and LVM a good combination for this system? 2 TB hdd


    Hello everybody!

    I just bough a new 2 TB hard disk and I'm wondering, would it be a very wild idea to use GPT instead of MBR? Is there any real advantage? (my BIOS is a regular one, not a UEFI)

    And the second part is that I'd like to try some distributions now that I have plenty of space. (I use Ubuntu). Is using LVM a good idea for this? I read that using LVM you can resize your partitions on the fly, and I want to know more about this.

    Let's suppose I use the following partitioning method with the old MBR partition table:

    Code:
    sda1   ext4      /           30 GB
    sda2   ext4      /home     1925 GB
    How would that be with GPT + LVM?

    Would it be possible to resize sda2 whenever I want (even if it has many GB in use but a few unused) to create other partitions that I'd use with other distributions (Arch, Gentoo, Debian, Ututo)? And if I'm tired of them, give the GBs back to sda2?

    Any advice and suggestion is accepted, thank you very much in advance!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tauro_kpo View Post
    I just bough a new 2 TB hard disk and I'm wondering, would it be a very wild idea to use GPT instead of MBR? Is there any real advantage? (my BIOS is a regular one, not a UEFI)
    well, for one, it allows you to access disks > 2TiB in capacity. it also supports a practically limitless number of partitions. GPT (and UEFI) will be the norm in the future so you may as well embrace it. unless, of course, you have a need to support a legacy OS.

    I don't use LVM - not a fan. If I were you, i'd just make a partition for each OS I want to add. Then when I'm done, I can always reformat them and mount them on my original system as /data, e.g.

    i get how it is desirable to reclaim space and add it back to an existing partition, but when the you have so much available storage space, it just doesn't seem worth messing w/LVM resizing when you can just reformat and mount it somewhere.

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up

    Thanks for your help atreyu

    Why you don't like lvm at all? is there a good reason to keep away from it?

    What do the others have to say?

    I was reading a lot (but I know it wasn't enough of course) about lvm, and even if I forget completely about gpt, how would I boot multiple (let's shrink it down to 3, with the option to later add more, let's say debian, arch and gentoo) distributions with mbr and lvm?

    I don't imagine what is the most correct way to do this. Do I need to create a separate /boot partition (sda1) outside the lvm partition (sda2)? can I create just a single vlm partition (sda1) and inside create a vg and many lv for the different partitions? I read somewhere that I need separate /boot partitions for each distro, that wouldn't be a problem as long as I could place them inside the lvm partition, inside the vg.

    Is it dangerous to resize lv or partitions (or filesystems) within a vg? Because that would be everyday fare if I plan to install and uninstall several linux distributions.

    thank you

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    i'm not a fan of LVM strictly b/c it is more complex/complicated and i've been too lazy to memorize all the proper commands for managing LVM volumes. Also, I've never been in the situation where I desperately need to re-size a partition on the fly. To be clear, it is definitely more flexible than standard partitioning, I'd just rather get by w/the old school ways, if and when I can.

    Is it dangerous to resize lv or partitions (or filesystems) within a vg? Because that would be everyday fare if I plan to install and uninstall several linux distributions.
    As I understand it, no - that is the point of LVM.

    as far as /boot partitions go, you can have just a single boot partition (e.g., sda1), but you may have to manually configure it that way. you don't need to do that, though (unless you really just want a single /boot partition - which is what I prefer). Most modern distros will detect other OSs on the boot drive and allow you to install them along side each other harmoniously. However, you'd have to use the boot loader of the OS currently being installed in order to access all the installed OSs. Either that, or keep a previously installed one, and update it to include the newer OSs, but that is more advanced (but totally doable). Do some research on the OSs you want to multi-boot to see what is the best way to do it.

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