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Hello Guys I would Like to Ask about the Partition I have a 160 Giga HDD I want to install Backtrack how Do I do the partitioning ??? also If ...
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  1. #1
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    question about the partition process


    Hello Guys I would Like to Ask about the Partition
    I have a 160 Giga HDD I want to install Backtrack how Do I do the partitioning ???
    also If I want to install Backtrack + fedora what shoul I do

  2. #2
    Just Joined! TinoY's Avatar
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    Although i did not install backtrack, durring installation you can chose an option such as "install by side" or something like that.
    First install fedora. You will be able to partition the disk during the installation. Chose how much you want to give to fedora and save the rest for backtrack. After installing fedora, reboot with the installation disk/usb of backtrack and repeat the process. Chose the option to install backtrack "by side".
    They have a quick how-to on setting this up with windows but it just might be the same and even easier because fedora uses grub bootloader.

    The link: (w)(w)(w).backtrack-linux.org/tutorials/dual-boot-install
    (cant put the link itself... dont have 15 posts )
    Additionally you can get GParted, wich is an operating system designed for partitioning.

    A good idea might be to boot from a live-cd and format the drive before installing anything

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    Quote Originally Posted by TinoY View Post
    Although i did not install backtrack, durring installation you can chose an option such as "install by side" or something like that.
    First install fedora. You will be able to partition the disk during the installation. Chose how much you want to give to fedora and save the rest for backtrack. After installing fedora, reboot with the installation disk/usb of backtrack and repeat the process. Chose the option to install backtrack "by side".
    They have a quick how-to on setting this up with windows but it just might be the same and even easier because fedora uses grub bootloader.

    The link: (w)(w)(w).backtrack-linux.org/tutorials/dual-boot-install
    (cant put the link itself... dont have 15 posts )
    Additionally you can get GParted, wich is an operating system designed for partitioning.

    A good idea might be to boot from a live-cd and format the drive before installing anything
    Thanks for the info

    but I wanted to ask how to do the partition
    how uch is every partiion [/ - boot and all the other stuff]
    also I would like to do a partition like D in windows so i can save my files in it
    MY HDD =160
    2 G ram

  4. #4
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    My installs typically involve 2 partitions.
    15 or 20 GB for / is more than enough. The /home partition will depend on personal needs. If you don't plan on saving much by way of music or movies, then another 20 GB will do you nicely.
    Depending on your situation, a third partiton for SWAP may be i order... 1 or 2 GB should be about right for that.
    Jay

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayd512 View Post
    My installs typically involve 2 partitions.
    15 or 20 GB for / is more than enough. The /home partition will depend on personal needs. If you don't plan on saving much by way of music or movies, then another 20 GB will do you nicely.
    Depending on your situation, a third partiton for SWAP may be i order... 1 or 2 GB should be about right for that.
    Thanks
    any ideas for the storage partition?

  6. #6
    Just Joined! TinoY's Avatar
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    You may consider the /home partition your storage.
    I had a similar problem when moving from windows. The thing is that all binaries and executables will be put in the / directory.
    If you insist on a separate partition, i would say go for 50%/50% between /home and /data of the remaining space after allocating to the / (root)
    The fact is that you will sooner or later use the command-line for every day use. And every time you start it you will be put into the /home/username as your starting point.

    To give you an idea, here is my setup
    Code:
    tinoy@txor [$]: df -h
    Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1              12G  4.6G  6.7G  41% /
    /dev/sda6             132G   22G  110G  17% /home
    The thing I like about linux is that, unlike windows, on even the most basic set up, separates configuration and elfs(exes) from your personal storage (/home).
    So if i wanted another /storage. Personally I would split them between /home and /storage.
    Example setup
    Code:
    tinoy@txor [$]: df -h
    Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1              12G  4.6G  6.7G  41% /
    /dev/sda6              66G   22G  44G  33% /home
    /dev/sda7              66G     0G  66G   0% /storage
    Keep in mind to leave some space for backtrack, so the setup above would be halved (33G for both), so i could have at least 30G for another OS.

    Hope that gave an idea of how to split things up.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TinoY View Post
    You may consider the /home partition your storage.
    I had a similar problem when moving from windows. The thing is that all binaries and executables will be put in the / directory.
    If you insist on a separate partition, i would say go for 50%/50% between /home and /data of the remaining space after allocating to the / (root)
    The fact is that you will sooner or later use the command-line for every day use. And every time you start it you will be put into the /home/username as your starting point.

    To give you an idea, here is my setup
    Code:
    tinoy@txor [$]: df -h
    Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1              12G  4.6G  6.7G  41% /
    /dev/sda6             132G   22G  110G  17% /home
    The thing I like about linux is that, unlike windows, on even the most basic set up, separates configuration and elfs(exes) from your personal storage (/home).
    So if i wanted another /storage. Personally I would split them between /home and /storage.
    Example setup
    Code:
    tinoy@txor [$]: df -h
    Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1              12G  4.6G  6.7G  41% /
    /dev/sda6              66G   22G  44G  33% /home
    /dev/sda7              66G     0G  66G   0% /storage
    Keep in mind to leave some space for backtrack, so the setup above would be halved (33G for both), so i could have at least 30G for another OS.

    Hope that gave an idea of how to split things up.
    Thanks for that I got it
    and one last question plz
    the / is the system binaries does it contain teh swap or the swap is another partition ?????

  8. #8
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    SWAP is another partition. You'll want to create it during installation.
    Jay

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  9. #9
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    From what I've read in the docs for backtrack installing it may not be a good idea. In the docs it says that it is not a normal distro, does not support a lot of hardware and that if you start adding or changing stuff you could end up breaking a lot of things.

    So, if you install it and get it to run directly on your hardware, in the process of making all of that work you could potentially break other stuff. For this reason I just run it in a virtual machine; far less headaches and works great.

    This does not mean that you *can't* install it; just maybe you shouldn't.

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