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Hi, I am trying to install Mandriva PowerPack 2011 on Lenovo ThinkPad E530 i7, it has windows 7 installed on it. I successfully downloaded and wrote the iso on a ...
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  1. #1
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    Mandriva 2011 PowerPack on lenovo ThinkPad E530


    Hi,
    I am trying to install Mandriva PowerPack 2011 on Lenovo ThinkPad E530 i7, it has windows 7 installed on it.

    I successfully downloaded and wrote the iso on a DVD, but when I try to install it , the partition stage fails, I have a lenovo backup of 17GB disk, a 446GB hard disk, from which only 42 is used by windows, I already ran "chkdsk c: /f /r" successfully.

    any ideas are appreciated ...

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Linux User martinfromdublin's Avatar
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    Hi, welcome to the forum! Are you aware that the Mandriva company has currently run out of money and is up for sale? This has meant no new releases or updates for almost a year. Now don't get me wrong, Mandriva was my very first Linux, then called Mandrake but I've stopped using it as development appears to have ceased. You might be better off with something like OpenSuse as it's quite similar, I recommend the network install ISO as it's small and the OS downloads over your broadband connection giving you a very clean install, no worries about corrupted ISO's.

    The other alternative is Ubuntu as you don't have to partition your drive for that, just download the Wubi and the rest downloads automatically when you run it. This then creates a virtual hard drive on your system and Ubuntu runs off that creating a dual boot in the Windows bootloader. The beauty here is if you don't like it you can remove it via the Windows control panel using the uninstall option and your system is still untouched. Also, there is a KDE version which looks and feels very much like Mandriva's.
    LINUX: Where do you want to go.......Tomorrow!

    Registered Linux user 396633

  3. #3
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    Hi,
    How about 2012 version ??
    I am just familiar with mandriva and don't want to learn new distros.
    if the 2011 or 2012 versions are good then it will be fine if there are no new releases for a while .

    THanks

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  5. #4
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    Lenovo E530

    Let me state I am no techie. I was going to dual boot a Lenovo bought with Win7, with LinuxMint. Looking on the Lenovo forum site I found that someone was asking advice on this topic. It would appear that Lenovo laptops using Intel i5 or i7 processors format their HD using the newly adopted (for Windows OEM) GPT, or GUID Partition Table. Linux is apparently fully aware of GPT, but, as far as Lenovo laptops are concerned, does not like it.
    The reply was to the effect - reformat the HD using NTFS and the old partition table, reinstall W7, then install your Linux in the usual way.
    Wether it is unsupported Mandriver, or any other distro, it does not matter. Dual boot apparently will not work.
    I hope a techie will post an explanation in due course.
    Good luck.
    Richard

  6. #5
    Linux User martinfromdublin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mandrivaFan View Post
    Hi,
    How about 2012 version ??
    I am just familiar with mandriva and don't want to learn new distros.
    if the 2011 or 2012 versions are good then it will be fine if there are no new releases for a while .

    THanks
    There is no 2012 version of Mandriva, development stopped after 2011, nothing else since then. I still recommend you try Ubuntu via Wubi as it makes no changes to your system ie; your partition table stays as it is and just a couple of gigs are taken off to create the virtual drive, the dual boot is then inserted automatically. The worst that can happen is Ubuntu might not run, if so, you can then remove it in the Windows control panel and your machine is still the way it was before as Windows plus your hard drive remain untouched.
    LINUX: Where do you want to go.......Tomorrow!

    Registered Linux user 396633

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