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Hi, I am a novice to Linux and have been running Xubuntu for only a few months. I have always used MS Win and Mac OS. I am currently switching ...
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  1. #1
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    Question configure dual-boot restart settings?


    Hi, I am a novice to Linux and have been running Xubuntu for only a few months. I have always used MS Win and Mac OS.

    I am currently switching to Linux but still need Win for work. My question is:

    I would like to setup a dual boot Win 7 and Undecided Linux distro, which I have done, however, I would like to configure the dual booting to automatically restart in the same OS without asking when I select restart?

    I successfully set up a dual boot W7 and Xubuntu 12.04 about a month ago, however, when I ran updates and restarted, the OS selection splash screen would come up, rather than automatically restarting the same OS. **Only applies to "RESTART", not SHUTDOWN or HIBERNATE.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Edit the /etc/default/grub file as root as explained at this link:

    grub2 - Grub 2, switch os when restarting - Super User

  3. #3
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    I am guessing this command is done in Terminal? I will try this, thanks.

  4. #4
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    You would need to open a text editor as root user, use sudo before the command. I don't know what the default text editor for Xubuntu is but if it is gedit just open a terminal and type: sudo gedit /etc/default/grub. It's a text file but you need to have root/admin privileges with sudo to edit it. Before making any changes, I would make a copy of the file and move it somewhere temporarily, your /home/user directory in case you have problems. I have a version of Ubuntu installed which has the first line but not the second so you will need to manually add it.

  5. #5
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    Thanks. I am deciding between Lin Mint 13 Deb full or Xfce, Xubuntu 12.04, or CentOS 6.3. I've compared a few others and have come down to these three. Stability and long-term support and most important to me, rather than 'bleeding edge'. The primary comp I am setting up is a Dell Latitude e6400 with 6GB RAM and 320GB HD (which is currently blank).

    The only other question I have is, is it best to install Win 7 first, then Linux? This is how I set up the last dual-boot and what seems to be more common.

  6. #6
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    It is best to install windows first because it will automatically overwrite the master boot record and you will not be asked or informed that this is happening. It will also be easier to use the Grub bootloader because you would need to get third party software to boot Linux from windows. In regard to your OS options, CentOS is very stable and has good support but is primarily meant for servers. I'm not sure if it has a Desktop version but you could easily look into that.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    As yancek suggested already, Install Windows OS first and create partition structure for Linux OSes after that. You have 6GB RAM therefore there is no need to create SWAP partition. Installer of Linux distros detect other installed OSes and setup multiboot by default. You won't face any boot setup problems.
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    Thanks everyone. CentOS does have a desktop edition, which has very good reviews. I tried to install it on VirtualBox to test but an error kept coming up. I am still considering it though.
    If I do not create a SWAP partition, are there any specific settings I need to change? Here are the instructions I followed to create the last dual-boot setup, and will most-likely use them again:

    linuxbsdos.com/2012/05/17/how-to-dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7

  9. #9
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    That's a pretty nice walk-through to follow. As far as changing anything if you're not using SWAP, just skip that step.
    For stability, CentOS will do should quite well for you.
    If you decide that it's not to your liking, you can always install another distro and give that a whirl.
    Jay

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  10. #10
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    I will try CentOS. This is a different question, but is there an advantage to the YUM installer over Synaptic? If I do not like YUM, can I replace it with Synaptic on CentOS?
    I've been getting used to Synaptic with Xubuntu.

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