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If you want to allow Linux to fully replace Windows and allow it to use the entire drive in the process, I'd recommend backing up any important data to another ...
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  1. #11
    oz
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    If you want to allow Linux to fully replace Windows and allow it to use the entire drive in the process, I'd recommend backing up any important data to another hard disk, then tell the Linux installer to utilize the entire hard drive for the Linux install. The installer should create the necessary partitions (removing Windows in the process), format them for Linux, then install Linux onto them. After the install has completed, you can tweak the system to your satisfaction, and restore any data to the new Linux system as it might be required.

    Note that Linux generally doesn't take as much hard drive space as Windows, so you might be unnecessarily wasting hard disk space for Linux, but that's left up to the end user's discretion. Keep in mind that it is easier to restrict the amount of space going to Linux before the install than it is afterwards.

    Either way, good luck to you with your new install, and do let us know how it all turns out...
    oz

  2. #12
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    Partitioning the hard drive cannot be done with my edition of Windows without formatting
    There would be no point in creating an additional partition if you didn't format (create a filesystem) the new partition. If your windows partition takes up the entire drive, that is standard for windows installation other than a recent OEM install. You would shrink the windows partition, create a new partition and format it for use with Linux or whatever.

    There would be no partitions to direct the distribution to use. And so far, no one has written that I can install into a folder.
    That is the only way I know of to install Linux as a program, the wubi type install within windows which you don't want. I'm not aware of any method to install to a "folder", Linux or windows. The standard method is to install a Linux distribution to one partition but there are numerous options. I'd suggest deciding on a distribution you want and reading some tutorials online so that you have a better understanding of it.

    It also might be useful to get a better understanding of partitions, filesystems or at least Linux naming conventions for drives/partitions because it is totally different than windows.

  3. #13
    Just Joined! WhitePhoenix's Avatar
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    Thatís strange. I just checked my email and had a message that someone named AmericanLifestyle7 had made a reply yesterday. But there is nothing here since a week ago. Oh well, no big loss. He was giving advice on re-installing XP.

    Well, I have been thinking and Windows help also states the size of the current partition can be changed. I donít know. I have been using computers from before Windows existed. In the old days, if you wanted a new partition, you had to reformat the hard drive to create two partitions. Aside from that, Linux and Macs seem to have slightly different definitions of what a partition is, which doesnít help. And while having both operating systems sounds nice, the idea is to get rid of the high maintenance Windows OS with its features that donít work and need to be replaced with third-party utilities. Not to mention the virus and worm attacks that Linux doesnít seem to have a problem with. Spybot doesnít make a Linux version. It finally occurred to me that it is probably because there is no need for a program like Spybot on a Linux system.

  4. #14
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    In the old days, if you wanted a new partition, you had to reformat the hard drive to create two partitions
    I've never experienced that but I haven't been using computers since prior to 1980. The standard method is to shrink a partition if you have just one partition with windows and use the remaining unallocated space for whatever you want.

    Aside from that, Linux and Macs seem to have slightly different definitions of what a partition is, which doesn’t help
    Not really, at least Linux and windows. I've never used a Mac. Windows generally refers to partitions with letters such as "C:\", "D:\" while Linux refers to them as sda1, sda2, etc.

  5. #15
    Just Joined! WhitePhoenix's Avatar
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    UPDATE: I went with Linux Mint / MATE. I backed up all the important folders of Windows 7 and did a clean install of Mint. Then I*moved my library of reference files, etc. into my home/<user> folder. Moved or added other custom folders as well. Then I was good to go. I am still in the process of adapting and finding replacement programs, but Iím functional.

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