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I have an old (10+ yrs) laptop partitioned with Windows XP(30GB) and Fedora 11(10GB) on which I would like to install only Ubuntu 10. I think Windows can un-partition, and ...
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  1. #1
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    Unpartition before or during Ubuntu install?


    I have an old (10+ yrs) laptop partitioned with Windows XP(30GB) and Fedora 11(10GB) on which I would like to install only Ubuntu 10.

    I think Windows can un-partition, and it looks like Ubuntu can un-partition during install. So which is better, un-partition using Windows, then install Ubuntu, or un-partition during Ubuntu installation?

  2. #2
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    You can easily delete and/or create or edit partitions from the Ubuntu partitioner as well as create filesystems. If you are going to just be using Ubuntu, doing it that way would be the simplest.

    A ten year old computer will have difficulty running a current release of Ubuntu, depends on the specific hardware though. You indicate you plan to install Ubuntu 10 which no longer has any support for security or other updates. You might look into a lighter weight distribution.

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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    A ten year old computer will have difficulty running a current release of Ubuntu, depends on the specific hardware though. You indicate you plan to install Ubuntu 10 ............
    Thanks, I was thinking of Ubuntu 10 because a) I have an installation disc and b) Ubuntu 10 and the hardware would probably be a better match than the current release of Ubuntu.

    Yup, no support, but my needs for this one are few...

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    Linux Newbie slw210's Avatar
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    I would wipe the hard drive clean, then set partions on install.

    I use Derek's Nuke and Boot from the Ultimate Boot CD, sorry, I can't post links yet.

    My old Compaq Presario 700 runs the latest Fedora just fine as well as a few other current distros.

    I just wiped the drive and repartitioned it last night and reinstalled basic Win XP (I have a couple things only have Windows software), I am planning on placing Fedora on the rest.

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    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    I would let Lubuntu 12.04 use the entire disk. Ubuntu 10.04 is no longer supported, which means you may have trouble connecting any new peripherals, such as external hard drives, usb drives, etc. The packages in the repository are no longer supported either and no new software will be available. Lubuntu uses fewer resources, and will probably run fine.
    Registered Linux user #526930

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    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    I'm with MASONTX on this one! Or take a look at LXLE (thanks, roky), SalentOS and other LXDE, XFCE and razorqt non-Canonical 'buntus based on 12.04.
    "What you think about me is none of my business"
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    So, last night I did the install, before seeing MASONTX and zenwalker's replies. It went well, works fine for what I use it for. Mostly surfing the web, which is what may have done in XP. I had an anti-virus installed and tried several other anti-virus programs when XP when south. No luck. Asked the IT guy at work to take a look, he couldn't figure out what was wrong and suggested I try Fedora, which led here.

    Thanks for the suggestions of Lubuntu and LXLE, I'll look them up!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattQ View Post
    Thanks, I was thinking of Ubuntu 10 because a) I have an installation disc and b) Ubuntu 10 and the hardware would probably be a better match than the current release of Ubuntu.

    Yup, no support, but my needs for this one are few...
    There are several alternatives for running a modern version of Ubuntu (so that you can have modern updates) but still run it on an older machine with fewer resources. One option is to install modern Ubuntu and simply change the Desktop Environment.

    I had problems running any Ubuntu (>10) because of Unity's graphical requirements. Installing Xubuntu as a DE fixed it for me.

    You can do this by first installing Ubuntu, then opening a non-graphical terminal with CTRL+ALT+F1, and then running "apt-get install xubuntu-desktop" (or lubuntu, kubuntu, etc...).

    Hope that helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    A ten year old computer will have difficulty running a current release of Ubuntu, depends on the specific hardware though. You indicate you plan to install Ubuntu 10 which no longer has any support for security or other updates. You might look into a lighter weight distribution.
    I am currenty using Ubuntu 13.04 on about a ten-years-old laptop. Because of the poor graphic card, I had to install there a XFCE session, but I have really no problem using it. So, donīt be afraid, newer versions (with a bit customisation in some cases) will run greatly

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