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Hello! I'm wanting to do a complete re-vamp of my computer. I've been using mainly Linux Mint 13 KDE (will upgrade during the process to 14), but use Windows 7 ...
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  1. #1
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    Triple Boot on a PC


    Hello! I'm wanting to do a complete re-vamp of my computer. I've been using mainly Linux Mint 13 KDE (will upgrade during the process to 14), but use Windows 7 for a lot of programs for my college classes and gaming. Lately, I've been wanting to try out Mac OS X for my own instead of just messing with somebody else's computer.

    I have a roughly 600 GB Hard Drive, with Linux using about 200, and Windows using the rest (I don't have many programs and things on my Linux partition, so didn't feel I needed more than Windows).

    How would I go about starting this without having to reinstall windows (and ~100 GB worth of games)? I have my Windows split into 2 different partitions, and I am willing to format that to use for Mac OS X. I understand that I have to have a Hackintosh to boot Mac OS on a non-apple computer, so that isn't an issue. I have an 8 GB Flash Drive I can use for the installation if that is the best way to go. This is a Viao Laptop with an i3 processor, if that information is needed.

    Normally, I would try to find the settings needed for a Hackintosh to work and just do it from there, but I have no experience with what to do with Linux's bootloader and REALLY don't want to mess it up.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Install a virtual machine manager such as VirtualBox in Mint, and install OSX in a VM - DO NOT try to install it natively or you will likely brick your system. Also, OSX requires some special treatment to get it to install either on a normal PC or in a virtual machine, but if you fubar a VM, you can delete it and start over. In any case, you need to do some Google searches to find out how to best deal with the peculiarities of OSX in a VM. I did it once, about 7 years ago, and did get it working - sort of...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    I have actually done a successful VM of OS X. I know that there are quite a few problems with trying to get OS X involved, but I also know that it can be done.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I just do not like multi-boot in general - it is often a bigger PITA than not. I prefer to use an external drive to boot another OS, such as a thumb drive, or external USB/eSata drive dedicated to the OS in question.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    If I use an external drive, would it be possible for the OS booted from it to access the memory from the computer itself? I've never used this method, so I don't really know what it all entails to be able to work.

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    If you attache an external drive with one operating system to a box (or laptop) with another operating system, yes it will use the RAM on the machine.

  8. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    A yancek said. It is just like booting from the system drive - it will be the system drive for the OS that you boot from it. Most systems can boot from an external usb drive, either a hard drive or a thumb (solid state) drive. If you have an external sata drive, you should be able to boot from that as well, though you may have to go into the BIOS to tell it to boot from that first instead of the internal drive.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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