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I have Windows 7 installed on a laptop. I want to install Linux along side of it. I have 3 partitions: 1. Recovery 2. System 3. C: From what I ...
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  1. #1
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    Installing Linux with Windows 7


    I have Windows 7 installed on a laptop. I want to install Linux along side of it. I have 3 partitions:
    1. Recovery
    2. System
    3. C:
    From what I understand I can shrink the partition C: and use the leftover space for Linux. Do I need to do anything with the other partitions?
    I was going to install Grub as the master boot loader. Anything else I need to know?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    After shrinking the partition in windows 7, you will be able to create other partitions for your Linux install during the installation. If this is your first time, I would suggest you do an online search for tutorials on installing whichever distribution of Linux you plan to use so you are a little familiar with it and know what to expect.

  3. #3
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    I would read these first -- How to Repair Win7 -- Move Win7 Recovery.

    Personally, I would boot with an new USB stick plugged in, make Win7 recognize it as a separate hdd then clone, image or otherwise move the Recovery partition to the separate drive; shrink the C:\ partition; and leave the System partition intact. Then see the second link again.

    This would allow making two partitions for your Linux distro -- a primary for / and an extended for swap and /home (and optionally, others). You'll probably need the boot repair media described in the first link to make sure Win7 boots correctly after the partition modification.

    Further, either purchase EasyBCD prior to (or revisit this forum with a new thread asking for instructions if boot problems occur following) installing your Linux distro.

    These recommendations are based on my experiences dual-booting Win7 and Linux, only.
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  4. #4
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    Do one thing install VM Ware software in your laptop so that you can run multiple OS with the help of VM Ware.

  5. #5
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    What are the partitions in windows7 used for? I thought the recovery was used for tools to repair the computer, but mine seems large.

    It could be hard to clone the recovery partition to a usb drive, it is 14G. Why is this so large, what does it contain? Was I going to move the recovery partition back afterward? I am unclear about primary and extended partitions; do I need a primary for each operating system?

  6. #6
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    Do you really want to keep Win7?

    The minimum that should be done is to create a System Repair Disc

    A Recovery partition is insufficiently "given" in lieu of an Installation DVD. System Repair Disc is not installable. It is only used along with Recovery to do just that.

    If no Win7 Installation DVD is available, neosmart.net offers good tools like Easy Recovery Essentials and EasyBCD, both avaiable for purchase, should you wish to keep Win7 and dual-boot, as you originally said.
    Last edited by zenwalker; 09-24-2013 at 07:39 AM. Reason: typo
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  7. #7
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    The Recovery partition contains the base system. You should have been prompted to create a Recovery CD when you initially booted windows 7. The recovery CD will boot to and acccess the recovery partition on the hard drive and will basically reinstall to factory default. Most major computer manufacturers will sell you an installation CD/DVD for $15-25USD to cover the 25 cent cost of the CD plus the time spent creating it.

    You do not need a primary partition on which to install Linux. Windows boot files must be on a primary partition.

  8. #8
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    I have a copy of Windows 7 that I obtained from:
    How to Install Windows 7 Without the Disc | PCWorld

    I wanted to keep Windows 7 because I use Windows occasionally for some programs.
    If I have an installation DVD then do I need to create the recovery partition?

    I am planning to reinstall Windows 7 and install Linux along side of it. I am thinking that will be the solution with the least problems, at least it worked with Linux and XP.

    How many partitions do I need to make as primary with Windows partitions? If I install Windows 7 in a partion will it partition that up according to its needs?

    Sorry if so many questions. I have been searching for a couple of days on the Net.

    Thanks

  9. #9
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    There is no way for anyone to realistically answer the questions in your last post as you don't present enough information. If you already have windows 7 installed as you indicate and it is functioning, why would you need/want to reinstall it?
    You haven't given specific information on the number of drives you have (one?) or the size of the drives).
    If you had an installation DVD, there would be no need for the Recovery partition. If you read through the link you posted, they clearly warn that their method has worked for some but has FAILED for others so there is certainly no guarantee you will not have problems. You would be better off leaving the Recovery partition until you know your installs have been successful. You can always delete it later.

    As I indicated above, windows NEEDS boot files on a primary partition, the others not necessary according to microsoft but you might as well put the system on a primary as well.
    You need to assure that you have at least one partition of the four primary allowed to create a partition for Linux.

    If I install Windows 7 in a partion will it partition that up according to its needs?
    According to its needs/wants, but not yours. I'm surprised you are having difficulty finding something online as when I search for dual-booting windows 7 with Linux I get thousands of hits. Might be a good idea to be more specific, which Linux distribution?

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