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Hi all, Joined forum because I desperately need some help. I wanted to install linux (64 Cinnamon) mint on an old mac mini and went the USB stick route to ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Jan 2014
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    Failed Mac Install for Dual Boot...Computer Dead? Please Help.


    Hi all,

    Joined forum because I desperately need some help. I wanted to install linux (64 Cinnamon) mint on an old mac mini and went the USB stick route to try and do this. I followed a procedure that seems fairly standard to use terminal to create a bootable image. Convert file to .img and then dd using

    Code:
    sudo dd if=/path/to/downloaded.img of=/dev/rdiskN bs=1m
    It said the drive was not recognizable, but I clicked ignore and then ejected it. I thought I'd try it anyway. I had installed rEFIt on my mac and I rebooted the mac with the drive in it.(Before this I resized the Mac OS X drive leaving ~50GB of free space for linux. Holding alt/option gave me to usb drives both called refit and a HD labeled refit. I selected the first usb which brought up a black screen with GNU GRUB version2.00("somethingubuntu"). This had the option to use the arrow keys to select test memory some other stuff and start linux mint 16. I selected this one and it just went to a black screen. I rebooted and tried again selecting the same thing and this time it seemed to start to load linux mint. I then clicked install when I got to the desktop and selected install alongside Mac OS X. I went to bed and woke up with it prompting me to restart. I clicked restart and it froze. Waited ~45 min and it did nothing so I held down the power button.

    Rebooting takes me to a black screen similar to the prior one I got with GNU GRUB version 2.00-19ubuntu2 at the top. This time the options to select are Linux Mint16, Linux Mint 16 -- recovery mode, Mac OS X (32-bit), and Mac OS X (64-bit). Selecting recovery mode cycles through some code and freezes. Slecting Mac OS X does something similar

    Holding down alt/option at boot now does nothing, just takes me to the mentioned black screen. Holding down 'c' with an inserted OS X disc takes me to the black screen as well.

    I really need help with this as I have no idea what to do now it doesn't seem like it will let me boot from anything. It says I can press c for a command-line, but I don't know what I could enter to exit that black screen or successfully boot linux. If possible I would like to preserve the old Mac partition because it has some photos on it and I didn't back it up (genius), but at the least I want this to be useable again.

    Thanks so much, I greatly appreciate any help, rather worried right now!

    TL;DR: Tried to install linux on usb to be able to dual boot with OS X. It failed and now computer only boots to black screen that does nothing when I select its options. Shi!#ing self.

  2. #2
    Just Joined!
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    Jan 2011
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    Huenfeld, Germany
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    Have you tried entering "c" to enter the command line? If you try this it may well give you the chance to login in command line mode. That being the case, you should do so, since that seems to be the only chance to get a response. If you get a login, try entering "startx" to get a GUI screen. Be prepared to save stuff to USB disk to give the results via whatever machine you are now using. Without a few visual details it's hard to figure out what is happening.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Huenfeld, Germany
    Posts
    30
    Just before going to sleep last night it occurred to me that ther is another possibility. Do you have a bootable CD or USB drive? If so, you could try booting with the CD. I have no knowledge about Mac OSX other than it is supposedly a Unix derivative. Linux will allow you to mount the filesystems manually and so inspect the files. If nothing else you should be able to recover Linux.

    This tutorial might give you an insight into what is possible. If you really need exhaustive detail you can try this HowTo from the Linux Documentation project.

    I admit that some of this stuff is over my head, but I've found the approach of booting from a CD useful in the past to fix similar problems.

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