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This is my first experience with a dual boot system. I recently got a PC with a dual boot of Mint and Kubuntu. Mint is on a primary (ext4) partition ...
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  1. #1
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    Dual Boot Partitioning


    This is my first experience with a dual boot system. I recently got a PC with a dual boot of Mint and Kubuntu. Mint is on a primary (ext4) partition but Kubuntu is on an extended partition along with a swap file. It appears to work well but I am wondering about the reason Kubuntu was put on an extended partition.

    I'm not very experienced with partitioning. I was told that each operating system should be on a primary partition. If I try to change the extended partition to a primary could I do so without losing the content?

    I'm wondering if the Mint primary partition is able to use the swap file which is on the extended partition.

    Should I not worry and just let it be as it is?

    14 0222 partitions.jpg

  2. #2
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okbud View Post
    This is my first experience with a dual boot system. I recently got a PC with a dual boot of Mint and Kubuntu. Mint is on a primary (ext4) partition but Kubuntu is on an extended partition along with a swap file. It appears to work well but I am wondering about the reason Kubuntu was put on an extended partition.

    I'm not very experienced with partitioning. I was told that each operating system should be on a primary partition. If I try to change the extended partition to a primary could I do so without losing the content?

    I'm wondering if the Mint primary partition is able to use the swap file which is on the extended partition.

    Should I not worry and just let it be as it is?

    14 0222 partitions.jpg
    You should not worry and let it be as it is. Linux doesn't care whether it is on a primary or extended partition.

    If you want to resize things or eliminate one of the OS's, then there are some things to be careful about. You have to understand something about the way the boot process works, so you don't accidentally mess something up.

    In particular, the main boot record, or MBR, is the first thing the computer turns to when it boots up. This will either have the LILO or GRUB2 bootloader--almost certainly the GRUB2 bootloader--and this will point to exactly one of the other partitions for its /boot directory. The contents of that /boot directory are then used to bring up the boot menu and boot up either Mint or Kubuntu. If you remove that partition, or change that partition's canonical ID, then the computer will fail to boot up.

    If that sounds confusing to you, then basically don't worry about it and leave things as they are. Changing around OS partitions isn't too hard when you know what you're doing, but it's easy to make mistakes if you don't know what you're doing.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

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    Thank you for the explanation, I'll leave it alone.

    One question unanswered: Is the Mint primary partition able to use the swap file which is at the end of the extended partition?

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    Is the Mint primary partition able to use the swap file which is at the end of the extended partition?
    Yes. You can have as many Linux distributions as will fit on your hard drive and they can all use the same swap partition.

    I was told that each operating system should be on a primary partition.
    No. A Linux system will not need to be on a primary partition. You will often see comments about windows needing to be on a primary partition or need to be on the first partition. If you search this at the microsoft site you will find that it is the boot files which need to be on a primary.

    An Extended partition is a primary partition. Creating an Extended partition will allow you to create logical partitions within the Extended. An Extended partition does not hold data but the logical partitions within it do. You would not be able to delete the Extended without first deleting the logical partitions within it unless something has changed recently.

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    Thank you. If there is a way to mark this Solved I don't know how to do it but I consider this Solved.

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    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okbud View Post
    Thank you. If there is a way to mark this Solved I don't know how to do it but I consider this Solved.
    I believe as the creator of the thread you can set it Solved in the Thread Tools menu.

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