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I have Installed Mint on a 120GB flash drive and on a 60GB SSD - for details see here . Unfortunately you can only define a maximum of 4GB of ...
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  1. #1
    whs
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    Need Universal USB Installer help


    I have Installed Mint on a 120GB flash drive and on a 60GB SSD - for details see here.

    Unfortunately you can only define a maximum of 4GB of persisitent storage. That is not a lot if you want to install a lot of stuff.

    I have already helped myself by defining a data partition in all of that remaining free space which I use to store my user data - that helps.

    What I am looking for is a sure way to extend these 4GB of persistent storage. I tried a few schemes that I found on the internet but none of them worked. They either did nothing or they bricked the system.

    If you know how to extend this persistent storage, please let me know.

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    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Did you reformat the USB stick that 4GB sounds like a FAT32 limit???

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    Persistent storage is used on a Live CD so that you can save changes. A Live CD is a read-only filesystem and the persistence allows changes to be saved on reboot. An actual install to your flash drive should work much the same as an install to a hard drive.

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    whs
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    Did you reformat the USB stick that 4GB sounds like a FAT32 limit???
    That may have been the original reason when flash drives were 2 or 4GB at best. But mine is 128GB - and it does the same on my 60GB SSD which is formatted in NTFS.

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    whs
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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    Persistent storage is used on a Live CD so that you can save changes. A Live CD is a read-only filesystem and the persistence allows changes to be saved on reboot. An actual install to your flash drive should work much the same as an install to a hard drive.
    Well, I am using the Universal USB Installer. And it limits the size of the persisten storage to 4GB. But there seem to be ways to extend that - I just did not yet find a viable way.

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    Code:
     note that casper persistence will only work with fat16 or fat32 formatted drives.
    The above statement is from the Universal USB installer page. The 4GB limitation has nothing to do with flash drives, it is the FAT filesystem that has this limitation.
    UUI puts a Live Linux on a flash drive, read-only unless you create persistence. Since you have already created another partition for data, your other option is to do an actual install of Mint to your flash drive the same way you would to a hard drive.

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    whs
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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    Code:
     note that casper persistence will only work with fat16 or fat32 formatted drives.
    The above statement is from the Universal USB installer page. The 4GB limitation has nothing to do with flash drives, it is the FAT filesystem that has this limitation.
    UUI puts a Live Linux on a flash drive, read-only unless you create persistence. Since you have already created another partition for data, your other option is to do an actual install of Mint to your flash drive the same way you would to a hard drive.
    Thanks for the answer. I guess I will try that. Last time I did it wiped my Windows 7 on the system drive. Fortunately I had an image from that morning. So it was easy to recover.

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    Before installing from the Mint installation medium, open a terminal in Mint and run this command: sudo fdisk -l(Lower Case Letter L in the command). This will show your hard drive and partition information. The drives will be listed as /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, etc. The sda drive will probably be your windows if you have it on an internal hard drive. Below is a sample output showing a windows partition, sda1. Note that under the system column it says HPFS/NTFS meaning it is a windows partition. Make a note of the partition so that when you install you do not install over your windows. Mint has a 'Something Else' option with its installer which will work a lot better and give you more information and control over the installation. Selecting the 'Install Alongside' method seems easier but you have no idea what is happening. Good luck with it.

    fdisk -l

    Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x1549f232

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 2048 206847 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    Before installing from the Mint installation medium, open a terminal in Mint and run this command: sudo fdisk -l(Lower Case Letter L in the command). This will show your hard drive and partition information. The drives will be listed as /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, etc. The sda drive will probably be your windows if you have it on an internal hard drive. Below is a sample output showing a windows partition, sda1. Note that under the system column it says HPFS/NTFS meaning it is a windows partition. Make a note of the partition so that when you install you do not install over your windows. Mint has a 'Something Else' option with its installer which will work a lot better and give you more information and control over the installation. Selecting the 'Install Alongside' method seems easier but you have no idea what is happening. Good luck with it.
    Thank you again. That is very useful information. I will try to install on my 60GB external SSD which I can attach via eSata, USB3 or USB2.

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