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  1. #31
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Jul 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by rayden View Post
    Also, what do you mean by "free up a ton of space on your hard drive"? Windows alone doesn't take up much space (probably 20GB or so).
    LOL, that's a huge amount IMHO. My Manjaro GNOME install with all the extra software that I run only takes up about 6GB max. Windows is Bloat Ware IMHO but if you like it then you run it and pay for some good virus protection because you'll need it.
    I also think that maybe you should just give up on Linux and stick with Windows because it really sounds like you're not willing to make the commitment that it takes to run a Linux system. Better to just let MicroSoft spoon feed you your Operating System then break free of their chains and enjoy the Freedom of using Linux and ONLY Linux.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  2. #32
    Nah, I'm gonna use both (Windows because I need it for games mainly, and Linux coz I wanna learn it). But still I find your determination to sack MS funny

    Also, I don't pay for AV. I never did. I only use free AVG and I've never run into troubles. I mean, I did get some viruses over the years but nothing serious to damage my computer.


    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    LOL, that's a huge amount IMHO. My Manjaro GNOME install with all the extra software that I run only takes up about 6GB max. Windows is Bloat Ware IMHO but if you like it then you run it and pay for some good virus protection because you'll need it.
    I also think that maybe you should just give up on Linux and stick with Windows because it really sounds like you're not willing to make the commitment that it takes to run a Linux system. Better to just let MicroSoft spoon feed you your Operating System then break free of their chains and enjoy the Freedom of using Linux and ONLY Linux.

  3. #33
    rayden, I think you are very familiar with windows and like it fine and may benifit from reinstalling it. you can benifit from this initial potentially frustrating experiance by forgetting what you think you know and starting to research the various types of multiboots with linux and deciding on one you think you would like to try. in the mean time reset your firmware to the previous setting. if you have decided you like linux mint then play with it live and get familiar with it. and make sure version suits the process you decide to try. as mentioned, you can google as well as I can, and as a novice user myself I can only offer googled information based on what I think your issue is and let you find it helpfull or not with your project. or share personal experiance and my opinion. if you have questions about your project volunteers are here to assist you unfortunately I do not have the answers you need. I wish you the best of luck. I do not speak for the forum but I suggest a new thread with a more specific question. you have attempted with out the instructions now it is time to start fresh with the instructions. cheers

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  5. #34
    Yeah, I'll do that eventually. I just wanna try one more time to fix the current installation through a Windows repair disk. When I get back home I will create that disk and try to fix the Windows bootloader. If this doesn't work, I will reinstall everything from scratch. I just hope I won't lose my 250+ GB of data that I saved from the old computer cause that won't be funny now that I got rid of the old HDD.

    Thanks for the tips and... wish me luck!

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmy View Post
    rayden, I think you are very familiar with windows and like it fine and may benifit from reinstalling it. you can benifit from this initial potentially frustrating experiance by forgetting what you think you know and starting to research the various types of multiboots with linux and deciding on one you think you would like to try. in the mean time reset your firmware to the previous setting. if you have decided you like linux mint then play with it live and get familiar with it. and make sure version suits the process you decide to try. as mentioned, you can google as well as I can, and as a novice user myself I can only offer googled information based on what I think your issue is and let you find it helpfull or not with your project. or share personal experiance and my opinion. if you have questions about your project volunteers are here to assist you unfortunately I do not have the answers you need. I wish you the best of luck. I do not speak for the forum but I suggest a new thread with a more specific question. you have attempted with out the instructions now it is time to start fresh with the instructions. cheers

  6. #35
    Ya I hear that. vast data needs back up and pluggable drives are handy sometimes.

    ubuntu has better continuity than windows 8 across devices I think. not a particular fan of either but like the concept and can see it better in linux

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtNhlVn3ETQ

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQLe3iIMN7k

    virtual machine on windows and linux can run a host of operating systems for testing. in addition a good dual boot with programming and compiling tools will allow you to build stuff and run most software. It can feel good to have created it yourself but good advice regardless of medium is key to success . sorry I could not be better help and hope you get what you want out of that shiney new toy.
    and maby just maybe that last attempt will be the ah-ha moment

  7. #36
    It's OK. The links you gave earlier in my thread (not in this last reply) are pretty good. Actually, I'll pick one of those methods to make my system dual boot. I just don't know yet which one

    Thanks for the help. I've learned quite a few things while "chatting" on this thread, not necessarily about linux but about computers in general. For example, until deciding to give linux a try a few weks ago I never changed anything in BIOS... EVER. When I was a kid (about 25 years ago) my uncle (who was working for the biggest computers company in my country at that time) told me "whatever you do with your computer never touch the BIOS". Since that day I always kept away from the DELETE button (the one that enters BIOS). But over the last days when I had to go to BIOS to change settings in order to be able to dual boot I picked up quite a few tricks about using BIOS. Sure, I still think it's dangerous business to fiddle with BIOS if you don't know what you're doing, but I know a few things about it now. And it feels cool. Among my friends I feel like God now

    Also, I've heard about VM before but I never used it. One of my friends used it and said it's a bit complicated to set up. I don't know if it's tru or not but I know for sure I'll try it before year's end. Actually there's many things I wanna try and learn how to use, like VM, PlayonLinux, Wine, getting familiar with the terninal, assigning keyboard shortcuts for the various Linux apps and tools, learning basic Linux stuff (terminal commands, installing and switching between various desktop environments) and so much more, that I don't even know where to begin. But obviously I'll need a good working system first, which hopefully will be had today.

    One more question if you don't mind: is it possible to run 2 or more DIFFERENT distros at the same time? I mean, it probably is, but what I need to know is if it's possible to install additional distros along the one already installed (Mint 17 Xfce) WITHOUT ruining the bootloader of any of them. And now that I mentioned it, do all the distros boot from the same partition or any distro installs its bootloader in different partition? I don't know how this works

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmy View Post
    Ya I hear that. vast data needs back up and pluggable drives are handy sometimes.

    ubuntu has better continuity than windows 8 across devices I think. not a particular fan of either but like the concept and can see it better in linux

    Ubuntu Edge: the software story - YouTube

    Ubuntu Edge: introducing the hardware - YouTube

    virtual machine on windows and linux can run a host of operating systems for testing. in addition a good dual boot with programming and compiling tools will allow you to build stuff and run most software. It can feel good to have created it yourself but good advice regardless of medium is key to success . sorry I could not be better help and hope you get what you want out of that shiney new toy.
    and maby just maybe that last attempt will be the ah-ha moment

  8. #37
    well you have to start somewhere and live cd is the best place to start, you can not hurt anything running live but are limited.

    virtual machines are not difficult to set up for live runs but can get more complicated when installing and wanting to use various network connections etc, after all it is virtual not actual install to actual hardware regardless what people say. but I recently added vm to one of the linux boxes and just had to select an amount of ram and space to allowcate and then figure out how to boot the iso. I booted live and connected to wifi but did not use the bluetooth or network printers or anything. but like livecd/usb, vm offers a safe place to mess around.

    dual booting is great for freedom as you get the best of two systems and any software that runs on them. to run both at the same time you would have to run a vm in a small window. you can install several linux if you like next to mint but they will boot one at a time.

    you do not have to install the bootloader during install but can edit bootloaders to include all the installed os, I am not skilled at it and learning as i go, so as mentioned can not help much there. you can likely boot some distro from the install cd. I installed a slackware derivitive Vector linux recently to a computer with a few other linux os on it(maby win also I forget) and rather than install the bootloader to mbr or edit the bootloader, I boot the install cd and before it auto boots type linux root=/dev/sda4 ro and the partition boots and takes me to the desktop. the option is noted on the install cd's boot screen but may be an option on other distros, it is the first time I did that. It was not a efi but classic bios unit. I took advantage of the oportunity as I can format the partition and nothing is otherwise changed.

    this all may sound good but on an efi enabled system is out of my current knowledge in application.

  9. #38

    Post

    I knew there is something weird with my MB. I contacted Gigabyte and I just received a reply from them saying to download some chipset drivers for Linux from chipset vendors or 3rd party. Here's my message and their reply:

    Question:

    I can't dual boot Windows and Linux. As a matter of fact I can't install/run Linux AT ALL on my MB and it's most likely cause of the BIOS. Which I have no idea how to set up or modify in order to run Linux. So yeah, tell me what kind of setup I need in BIOS (or tell me how to run Linux on this MB) cause I have wasted close to 50 hours (6 hours a day for 8 days now) of trying all possible set-ups I could think of, plus a dozen Linux distros (both on 32 and 64 bits, both UEFI and/or Legacy distros), including resetting the CMOS. The only things I didn't do yet are flashing and upgrading the BIOS and I was very close to doing these as well, I just gathered my last piece of lucidity and decided to contact you instead. Anyway, I have literally run out of patience for your MB and I want an answer NOW! And not just any answer but I want a fix for my problem. 8/15/2014 12:46 PM


    Answer:

    Dear John,

    Thank you for your kindly mail and inquiry. Basically, there is no special setting for install Linux OS. About the issue you mentioned, please load BIOS optimized defaults setting and make sure [Windows 8 Features] is set as [Other OS] in [BIOS Features] which allows you to select the operating system to be installed.

    Meanwhile, since it is related to install OS, we suggest you to contact Microsoft about the multiboot installation. As we mentioned on the driver download page of GIGABYTE website, due to different Linux support condition provided by chipset vendors, please download Linux driver from chipset vendors' website or 3rd party website. Since we do not receive proper driver from chipset vender, we cannot guarantee Linux to work on our system. Sorry if there is any inconvenience.

    Regards,
    GIGABYTE


    Now, could I please know what drivers Gigabyte support were talking about and where to get those? Pretty please!

  10. #39
    They are simply talking about drivers in general as propriarary drivers are not an issue for microsoft but can be for linux, setting the bios to other OS is another generic response from industry. unfortunately there is little actual information

    If you are still determined to install with a dual boot then as I said take a deep breath and decide what you want to do based on options and do it step by step. read as much as you can about any uncertainty.


    here is another link you should read and google for info on dual booting your distro choice with win 8.1 as there may be process specific to the distro.

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...Arch_Dual_Boot

    Install Ubuntu or Fedora WIth Windows 8/8.1 Dual Boot

  11. #40
    yeah man, I already know what I have to do. But every advice I find about dual-booting windows and linux says that I should install windows first. And I do. I always did this. But then, when it comes to installing linux it just won't work, no matter which distro I choose, no matter if I am installing via DVD or USB stick, no matter if the distro is 32 or 64 bits. I've tried everything I could, including messing up with the BIOS. I am literally thinking about flashing (is this the same thing as upgrading??) the BIOS and then try again. I really have no other idea what I should do.

    Actually, I will eventually install Linux alone and will install Windows in a VM probably. But the thing is, even if I want to install Linux first I just can't. I've tried it a few days ago with Mageia, Kali, Antergos, PinguyOS, and another distro that I forgot how it's called. But like I said, it makes no difference. It just doesn't want to install. I truly wished you (or someone who knows was here and see how imbecile this MB is).

    Oh, and no, I didn't lie. I really managed to install Mint 17 Xfce (actually, it was the only one that would install) at some point in time, but since I couldn't make the Gnome desktop work with Mint (it would crash every time) I uninstalled Mint and went for a Gnome based distro (Antergos, Pinguy, Kali, even Mageia I think comes with Gnome by default)

    So yeah, that's the last time I buy a Gigabyte MB (or one that doesn't support other OSes actually).

    Thanks for the links and for your help in general. Will check those 2 when I get home and see if I find some miraculous cure to the disease of my PC


    Quote Originally Posted by ohmy View Post
    They are simply talking about drivers in general as propriarary drivers are not an issue for microsoft but can be for linux, setting the bios to other OS is another generic response from industry. unfortunately there is little actual information

    If you are still determined to install with a dual boot then as I said take a deep breath and decide what you want to do based on options and do it step by step. read as much as you can about any uncertainty.


    here is another link you should read and google for info on dual booting your distro choice with win 8.1 as there may be process specific to the distro.

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...Arch_Dual_Boot

    Install Ubuntu or Fedora WIth Windows 8/8.1 Dual Boot

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