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  1. #1

    Error installing Linux


    Hi,

    I'm Tim and new to Linux and the forum. I acquired a IBM/Lenovo M52 Thinkcentre without a HDD. It is a 340ghz pentium 4 and has 2 gig of RAM. I installed a 160GB HDD out of an old Sky+ box (I don't know what type it is, but all the connectors fitted fine). I installed Windows XP on it and that works fine. As XP is no longer supported, I want to install Linux. I have tried Mint, Ubunto and Linux Lite, using 2 different USB drive creators and get the error message:

    Unable to find a medium containing a live file system

    I have googled this and it suggests changing HDD settings in BIOS. I can't find any settings in BIOS to do this. I am not a computer expert and an learning as I go along, please try and phrase any responses in not too techy language. Can someone give me some help to solve this please as I am keen to try Linux. My ideal would be installing Mint, but at the moment would be happy to get any usable OS up and running.

    I have tried different USB ports, and it does start reading from the USB stick as I get a linux logo.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    If you've had it reading from a different USB port and got to a Linux logo, then the installer was underway. Some older computer bios systems didn't support boot up off USB, newer ones can have problems with USB3 ports and USB2 devices.

    Once you had it reading the USB stick, then you should leave it to boot up. Remember that USB2 can be quite slow compared to a SATA interface so it might take a while to boot up.

    How did you install Windwos? Was it from a CD? Can you burn a Linux installer CD using an ISO image and install the same way?
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  3. #3
    Windows was from a CD. The linux files would be larger than a CD could hold wouldn't they? I did leave it and once it got to the error message it didn't continue. It was left with the error message and a flashing curser. I tried commands like run and install but that did nothing. Typing in reboot rebooted it. It is trying to boot from USB, I can enter BIOS and get it to temporarily boot from USB or change the startup order and put USB at the top.

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  5. #4
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    On many systems you can hit F12 or on some it's F9 and it'll let you select where you want to boot to.
    There are some Linux Distros that are small enough to fit onto a CD if you don't have a DVD drive. You can also pick up a DVD drive and swap out the older CD drive, normally they cost around $10 bucks on Ebay.
    Also, what did you use to make the Linux USB stick with? UNetbootin is a good tool to use, if you can download and install it then you can make a Live USB stick to boot to. Run it Live and make sure your wifi and stuff work before doing the install. If everything works and you like the look and feel of the OS then you can do the install.
    Peppermint OS 5 just came out, it's Ubuntu/Mint based and IIRC just under 600MB so it'll easily fit onto a CD and would be a decent enough OS to try out in order to get your feet wet with Linux.
    Just remember this is LINUX, you sometimes(most of the time as a matter of fact) need to start thinking outside of that Micro$oft Box. Linux gives you the freedom to do things your way and many times that's more then just one way.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  6. #5
    did you download the iso using unetbootin or what ever you used, or download with the browser and install with the application

    did you check your download size to be sure you have the entire download. linux has a md5 checksum that can be compared to the download. forget how to do that in windows but you can google it. otherwise compare the mb.

    I have had a download get to 10 meg from the end and appear to have completed but checking the noted download size, it was notably less and gave similar results..if the download is good and you used unetbootin to create a usb it should work...try a cd as mentioned and see if it does the same then redownload check the size and try again. many distros fit on a cd, 700meg but check it may be a dvd you have.

    if the cd works then it may be that the unit does not like to boot usb or that particular port..or stick

    if you have another computer that is known to boot usb it may help to try it.
    Last edited by ohmy; 08-13-2014 at 03:26 PM.

  7. #6
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timmm View Post
    Windows was from a CD. The linux files would be larger than a CD could hold wouldn't they?
    Only if you want the full install DVD's. For Fedora (and I'm sure that there are many other distros like this) I always use the network install CD - this is a lightweight disk image that contains the boot system and fetches the package information and all the binary data from the online repositories. This is way more efficient as it sets up your system with the latest packages right from the off, you never have to go get a raft of updates after the install is complete. It can be a little slower than installing off DVD originally if you measure up to the point where you can log-in for the first time, but not when you factor in the time taken to run updates for the first time.

    Quote Originally Posted by timmm View Post
    I did leave it and once it got to the error message it didn't continue. It was left with the error message and a flashing curser. I tried commands like run and install but that did nothing. Typing in reboot rebooted it. It is trying to boot from USB, I can enter BIOS and get it to temporarily boot from USB or change the startup order and put USB at the top.
    If you have it booting from the USB you should be good to go. Don't forget that if it's not a temporary boot sequence change you'll need to change it back before you can boot up off your hard drive.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  8. #7
    Thank you for your help. I burnt a copy of Peppermint to CD. It is working fine. I guess the PC didn't like a USB install for some reason. I have installed LibreOffice and comodo antivirus and most things seem good.

    What is a kernel?
    I have an error message for Comodo which is saying I need to type in a couple of lines. Where do I need to type them?

    These two questions I'm guessing are fairly basic and may make me sound a bit stupid!
    Last edited by timmm; 08-14-2014 at 01:32 PM.

  9. #8
    The set up should be fine for a bit of web browsing, email and basic word processing and accounts!

  10. #9
    Think I've discovered that I need to write it in Terminal... but it says I need to do it as an administrator. How do I change to administrator. The left hand side of the cursor says apple@Apples

  11. #10
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    -->
    The Kernel is the core of the operating system. If you like, you can consider it as the most privileged program running on your computer, one that marshals all access to the various bits of hardware on your system, keeps the scheduled tasks running, and allows you to run the computer. If you want to upgrade the kernel, you will end up doing a reboot, as you cannot change the kernel that is currently working. If you want to see what kernel you're running try doing 'uname -a' from that command line you mentioned.

    You've clearly found the terminal in your graphical user interface session - to get administrator privileges type 'su -' at the command prompt. It should ask you for an administrator password. If it doesn't and drops you straight to a root command prompt, you'd be well advised to set a password for this user immediately - your first command should be 'passwd', then follow the prompts to set it up, use a different password from your regular user one. You can then carry out the commands you wanted to use.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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