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  1. #1

    Live Boot from USB on Windows 8


    I recently decided to try Linux for the first time. I have tested a few distros using Universal USB Installer, Lili Drive, and Unetbootin. I have tested running from usb in Oracle VM Virtual Box. Now, I am trying to boot live from usb. I am not trying to install, just boot from usb. I have not been successful thus far. I am trying Bodhi, and I get the Bodhi boot screen, then I get a message (from my ASUS monitor) that reads : "No HDMI signal".

    After this message, I get a black screen and have to turn off power to the computer, then reboot.

    My system is running Windows 8. Secure boot is disabled.

    Any help is appreciated. Maybe I should just build an inexpensive Linux machine, but I would like to try some distros first. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by TinyMonsters View Post
    I recently decided to try Linux for the first time. I have tested a few distros using Universal USB Installer, Lili Drive, and Unetbootin. I have tested running from usb in Oracle VM Virtual Box. Now, I am trying to boot live from usb. I am not trying to install, just boot from usb. I have not been successful thus far. I am trying Bodhi, and I get the Bodhi boot screen, then I get a message (from my ASUS monitor) that reads : "No HDMI signal".

    After this message, I get a black screen and have to turn off power to the computer, then reboot.

    My system is running Windows 8. Secure boot is disabled.

    Any help is appreciated. Maybe I should just build an inexpensive Linux machine, but I would like to try some distros first. Thanks in advance.
    Hi

    It sounds like Bodhi doesn't recognise your graphics card or maybe the monitor. If there is an option to use Safe Graphics (or something that sounds similar) on the boot screen try that. Alternatively try a different distro such as Ubuntu (in my experience it recognises pretty much everything).

    Richard

  3. #3
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    Indeed an inexpensive Linux machine might be the best option . Many people are discarding their Win XP machine and give it away. I just got such a free machine with a Pentium 4 CPU and 512+ 256 = 768MB RAM initially having run Windows 98SE ,later upgraded with Win XP. The unit came freely with flat screen monitor + keyboard.
    Having installed Lubuntu 14.04 it runs surprisingly well . On e-bay I found 2 modules 512 MB RAM (DDR 333MHz) costing equiv US$ 8.00 incl P+P With the motherboard having 4 RAM slots adding these 2modules will bring the RAM capacity to 1792 MB (almost 2GB) which will make Lubuntu to fly .
    Lubuntu is my favourite distro inspite of itīs socalled lean desktop ,or perhaps just because of it .

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  5. #4
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    Hi,

    Have you tried Yumi? Yumi allows you to "install" multiple linux oses on the one usb stick and run any of them. Yumi website (YUMI ? Multiboot USB Creator | USB Pen Drive Linux ), says it is not intended to be used as an installer but rather to run the oses on the usb stick. However, I have had no problems installing from a Yumi usb.

    Re Bodhi, it had problems with dynamic resizing etc when running as a virtual machine on my Win 7 box. There are other LXDE desktop Ubuntu derivatives that are great. Try Lxle, Peppermint, or Zorin or simply Lubuntu.

    Which version of Ubuntu is it based on? I did have problems with Ubuntu and Ubuntu derivative installs based on Ubuntu 13-04 and 13-10. Both had the same issue of on reboot after install getting the "No HDMI" message. My boxes both use AMD 8 core cpus with 16GB ram and ATI graphics. Tried it on an intel i5 with Nvidea and got the same messages. Ubuntu 14-04 and derivatives have not had the problem.

    Fedora also has an LXDE spin which I had installed for an intellectually disadvantaged user for about 4 years - with no problems whatsoever. He is now using Mint 17 which is also excellent with none of the inherent Windows problems which this user had.

    Rather than running the distro from a usb stick, you could try installing VMWare Player which is free to download and use and works well on Windows 8 / 8.1 / 7. You can then install the os as a virtual machine and do all the things you would normally do such as updates, install software, browse the internet, etc. Make sure you also install the vm tools in the virtual machine. If you go this route, once you have installed the virtual machine, updated it and installed vm tools, shut down the virtual machine and make a copy of it. Then if you do something in the virtual machine that you are having trouble undoing, you can simply delete the entire machine, make a copy from your backup copy and start again in a couple of minutes. Easy! And fun.

    You can also run a few different virtual machines at the same time and compare them. Be aware that running a few virtual machines at the same time will likely slow them all down a bit, especially if your host box is low specced (slow dual core cpu, low ram etc).

  6. #5
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Ditto to buying an inexpensive older laptop to use as a "Testing" machine for Linux. You can get all kinds of good deals on Ebay if you know how to snipe and have the patients to do so. I recently picked up a very nice Dell D630 for $76 bucks shipped and I got my little Dell D420 for $50. Just figure what you're budget is going to be. Allow for shipping if there is any and then at the last 10 seconds of the auction make your top dollar bid and if you're lucky you'll get it for that much or less.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  7. #6
    Thanks to everyone for all your replies and ideas. I guess these are just some of the issues that can arise when using Linux. I will try some more distros, and the different usb installers. My system has an AMD A10-5800k Apu with a Gigabyte Radeon 6770 in dual graphics mode, so maybe dual graphics is an issue? And I have Oracle Virtual box, but I would like to try running distros as live boot. Either way, I am very interested in learning more about Linux as I really like the whole philosophy of GNU/Linux free software. I am keeping my eye out for a cheap older machine to make a Linux tester. I will let you know when I get a distro to live boot. Thanks again everyone for helping out a noob.

  8. #7
    I just wanted to mention, that so far my favorite distros are Linux Lite, LXLE, and Bodhi. I had all of them running very smoothly in VirtualBox.

  9. #8
    I have an HP DV6 laptop with AMD A-10 with 8GB RAM, Radeon HD 7660G graphics and it came with Win 8 so it's of course a UEFI box. After 2 hours playing with Win 8 I decided to just nuke it and turn this into a BIOS box. I repartioned the drive in MBR mode, shut off secure boot, and put UEFI in legacy mode. Once done, this machine behaves exactly like a pre-Win 8 computer and I have been able to boot and install many distros without issue. It's currently dual booting Win 7 and Lubuntu 14.04.

    Note that changing the UEFI settings may make Win 8 stop working. This wasn't important to me as I think Win 8 is useless. I was able to boot Mint in UEFI mode from a USB stick and could probably have installed it but that was a path I did not want to follow. Also note that each hardware vendor seems to implement UEFI differently so what works for me may not work for you; however, the options to change parameters will be somewhere in the machine setup. If Win 8 is important to you, expect to jump through hoops - if not then you can take the road I did and use your computer as a BIOS box...

  10. #9
    I am running Windows 8 on my computer, and I don't like it. One of the main reasons I am moving into Linux. But, I need to keep this machine running Windows, so eventually I will have a dedicated Linux machine. But Win8 really does make it difficult to test Linux. I read about UEFI and Legacy, but I don't want to wreck Win8 on this computer. I like what you did with yours though.

  11. #10
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    It is possible to dual boot Win 8 and Linux, it's just rather difficult and depends on how UEFI is implemented on your computer.

    One of the options I always use is to have spare hard drives that I can setup different ways. I initially just took out the Win 8 drive when I was considering keeping it just in case; however, I just formatted it as I knew Win 8 was not for me. It only takes a few minutes to swap drives and this gives me a lot of flexibility. I generally test new distros on a spare 250GB drive I keep for just this reason - it's probably been formatted hundreds of times...

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