Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1

    First Time multibooting with win7, Kali, Centos and possible Lubuntu


    Heh guys, just need some people to check my logic here and make sure it's sound. I have done a windows and Ubuntu dual boot more then a couple of times at this point starting with XP and fedora and going to windows 7 Ubuntu. With each computer. I tend to use Windows for work stuff and linux to play

    Got a new laptop with windows 8.1 can not stand it been "using" it for 2 months mostly cursing the damn thing.
    It is a Samsung AITV book 4 laptop with a I5 -3230M processor 6 GB of ram and a 750 GB HDD so I have a lot of real estate for OS's.
    Intel on board graphics so I don't see any issues there.


    Was intending to dual boot from Ubuntu but I feel I'm not moving forward with Ubuntu been using it for a while now.

    I'm ripping the windows 8 out and putting in windows 7 (work related) sooooo.

    Yes all my important data is backed up on another system or to the cloud I'm was in windows 10 preview but I'm leaving. I have to use windows 7 for work but I'm working on removing that issue. Should be done by 2020 or I'll move over to Mac for work .

    Turn off the secure boot in the bios and make sure it can boot from a USB

    Do a fresh install of Win 7 shrink the drive give windows 200 GB.

    Split the rest of the drive up into different partitions

    plan 1
    - 80 GB for Kali
    - 100 GB for centos (that may swap if Kali is a better daily drive)
    - Rest of the drive to hold data in FAT 32 So I can use it in any of the OS's
    - except a 12 gb swap portion at the end.

    OR

    Plan 2
    - 80 GB for Kali
    - 80 GB for centos
    - 80 Lubuntu as a daily use one
    - Rest of the drive to hold data in FAT 32 So I can use it in any of the OS's
    - except a 12 gb swap portion at the end.

    Now here are the Questions

    Does this work and what should those partitions be ie logical extended... etc? Is FAT 32 the best one to use for that or am I just clinging to old habits
    sorry I'm still trying to get my mind around what counts as a logical versus extended. To me a drive is either a physical drive or a logical drive. Lol little old school here.

    Do I need Lubuntu or would Kali or centos work as a daily use distro and am I just using Lubuntu as a crutch ?

    Which Distro should I load first and which should I load last?

    I'm thinking of using gparted to do the partitioning with the first disto install. Always before I've used the windows partitioning program it is closer to DOS so easier for me to understand. Is it that hard to use. Not really worried about messing up my system I have six other computers to use if this one dies. All I'm wasting is time

    Does Linux still have an issue with the NFTS read and writes?
    I assume yes but I thought I should check that one.

    Do I need that much room for the two Linux distro if my files are going to be on another drive?

    Wow that is way more questions then I thought i would have. Any issue you guys can see let me know.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Harrow, UK
    Posts
    1,454
    I can't answer all of these but there's other people here who can.
    Quote Originally Posted by compboy View Post
    Does this work and what should those partitions be ie logical extended... etc? Is FAT 32 the best one to use for that or am I just clinging to old habits
    That depends entirely on what Windows 7 can read (I've never used it). I know older versions of Windows could only read FAT16, FAT32 and NTFS. Linux can read all of these, and can write to NTFS partitions if you have the right tools installed.

    sorry I'm still trying to get my mind around what counts as a logical versus extended. To me a drive is either a physical drive or a logical drive.
    An extended partition doesn't contain any data. It's just a box for logical disks. Logical disks are used in exactly the same way as partitions; they exist only because a dos-style hard drive with an MBR could only contain four primary partitions and this was a way of getting extra ones. But your computer will have a GPT disk and you can create as many primary partitions on it as you like if you use a Linux partitioning tool.

    Do I need Lubuntu or would Kali or centos work as a daily use distro and am I just using Lubuntu as a crutch ?
    All Linux distros are good for daily use. And I think all the *buntus are crutches, though there are people here who won't agree with me.

    Which Distro should I load first and which should I load last?
    I don't think it matters.

    I'm thinking of using gparted to do the partitioning with the first distro install.
    Yes, that's essential. The traditional Windows fdisk is a lousy program. And gparted is very easy to use and works on both MBR and GPT disks.


    Does Linux still have an issue with the NFTS read and writes?
    Not with reads. I think it still does with writes. Someone else could help out there; lots of people here dual-boot with Windows.

    Do I need that much room for the two Linux distro if my files are going to be on another drive?
    I don't think any distro needs more than 10GB if you're keeping your data somewhere else. I use 20GB for source-based distros where I need building space but that's probably paranoid. And 80 GB is sinful extravagance!

    Good luck!
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

  3. #3
    Arrggh, so day spent getting windows 7 install, centos in a live CD, gparted used made the partition and Kali can't see it all. Kali and centos sees is unallocated space and I can not get it to see the windows partition. In the Windows 7 though the drive is shrunk. Gparted sees the partitions but it does keep warning me about it being a gpt drive. That doesn't work though because I can't get it to boot in the UEFI mode with out it trying to go to windows 8.

    Sigh taking a break I do have win 7 running so at least that is a little better then win 8

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Sigh and when I check the win 7 f disk I have the partitioning as it was laid down in gparted.

  6. #5
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Harrow, UK
    Posts
    1,454
    It's worth checking the kernel configuration file in /boot. According to the Arch wiki, it needs to have CONFIG_EFI_PARTITION set to "y" (not "m") in order to be able to read GPT disks. This is the default in Arch and Debian but I don't know about Kali.

    And you'll probably have better luck if you switch your UEFI into legacy BIOS mode.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

  7. #6
    So swapped to legacy mode killed the whole drive made a partition for Win 7 installed to that no issues. I did install Centos 7 well I think I did. I tried booting from that and it did not find win 7 and would not boot in regualr mode only rescue . Boot loader did not find the Win 7 install.

    I did install Kali which the grub2 did grab the windows 7 but not the centos 7. I can boot to Kali and to Win 7 without issues. Still can not find the centos install and to be frank the centos has been an issue begining to wonder if there is an issue with my ISO or the way I did the live boot from the USB. Not impressed with centos 7

  8. #7
    -->
    Got it to work wih fedora kali and windows 7

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •