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  1. #1

    Red face Virgin hardware


    Hi and thank you for your time , a quick question as far as installing a Linux OS on new hardware. (meaning never having a OS installed on it before)

    Do you need to have a Windows OS installed before installing Linux on brand new out of the box hardware?

    I've installed Linux OS's before but ....they have always have had windows installed on them.

    LOL..... I know just enough to really bugger stuff up but I'm not scarrrred ...
    Last edited by poppasmurf; 01-17-2015 at 10:52 PM.

  2. #2
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    You don't need anything installed on the hardware to get Linux running, as long as you have a bootable install image on something like a USB drive.

    And as for messing things up, the beauty of starting with a blank system is that you CAN'T make things any worse. If you get halfway through the install and loose power, then just start over. Nothing lost.

  3. #3
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    Partitioning -- have you done it?

    Is yours a UEFI system? -- Just a couple questions that may apply, since no hardware specs given.
    "All that is required for evil to triumph is for a good human to say nothing"
    _______________________________________________| Salix, Puppy & antiX

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  5. #4
    Sorry zenwalker .....Yes I believe the ASUS P9X79 WS is a UFEI based bios to prepare my iso with I use rufus and set it to read both types of bios

    The Hardware:

    CPU / I-7 3930
    MB / ASUS P9X79 WS
    GPU / Quatro 4200
    secondary GPU / GTX 970
    MEM / 64 GB - ECC
    OS Drive / ? PCI 1TB variant
    staging Drives - 1TB samsung 850 evo x 2 (raid-0)
    Last edited by poppasmurf; 01-18-2015 at 03:57 PM.

  6. #5
    cnamejj thank you for your input... but, I mean no offense but I would love to hear more input from others to reconfirm your's

  7. #6
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppasmurf View Post
    Sorry zenwalker .....Yes I believe the ASUS P9X79 WS is a UFEI based bios to prepare my iso with I use rufus and set it to read both types of bios

    The Hardware:

    CPU / I-7 3930
    MB / ASUS P9X79 WS
    GPU / Quatro 4200
    secondary GPU / GTX 970
    MEM / 64 GB - ECC
    OS Drive / ? PCI 1TB variant
    staging Drives - 1TB samsung 850 evo x 2 (raid-0)
    Sounds like one helluva system!

    Don't know if I'd use any bootloader other than the native GRUB or GRUB2, tho (especially since rufus is a .exe file).
    Wouldn't even need to worry about partitioning on the new hardware, I don't think.

    From habit, I'd just format the entire hdd to ext2 file system (but am not sure if this is necessary on the EVOs); and I would not attempt to install any Windows-oriented software on the SSDs before installing your distro of choice, having in mind your partitioning scheme (nevermind should volume management be chosen), then choose "Something Else" or "Manual" when the paritioning section of the install arises and change the then one existing partition as desired (but again this may not apply if wanting LVM). Hardware RAID in Linux I do not think exists, as yet.

    You're probably above my head, but if you want a Linux machine, keep it that way, would be my suggestion; and do not put anything MS on it, at all.
    "All that is required for evil to triumph is for a good human to say nothing"
    _______________________________________________| Salix, Puppy & antiX

  8. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Disable UEFI secure boot in the BIOS if you can. It will make the installation of Linux much simpler, and allow you to install older versions of the kernel, such as enterprise-class servers.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  9. #8
    -->
    thank you all for your input and cheers

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